Ohio governor

Campaign website

Democrat Ed FitzGerald, the Cuyahoga County executive, is expected to formally announce his candidacy for Ohio governor Wednesday at stops in Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati.

The Cincinnati event takes place at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Laborers' Local Union Hall at 3457 Montgomery Rd. in Evanston. RSVPs for all three events can be made here.

Michael Keating

This week WVXU Political Reporter Howard Wilkinson talks about the Ohio Governor's race and the changing attitudes on gay marriage, with Maryanne Zeleznik.

Brian Bull / WCPN

Another Ohio Democrat - former U.S. Rep. Betty Sutton - has said she won't run for governor in 2014, leaving the field nearly wide open for the only active candidate, Cuyahoga County executive Ed FitzGerald.

Sutton told the Cleveland Plain Dealer in an e-mail Friday that she thanked her supporters, but said "I have decided that I will not run for governor in 2014."

Michael Keating

Hamilton County Democrats will get a look at their only active candidate for Ohio governor on April 11, when Cuyahoga County Executive Ed FitzGerald is the featured speaker at a county party fundraising reception.

FitzGerald, the 44-year-old former mayor of the Cleveland suburb of Lakewood, announced last week he was forming an exploratory committee for a run for Ohio governor in 2014, when the Republican incumbent, John Kasich is up for re-election.

Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

As Democrats from across the state gathered in Columbus for their annual Legacy Dinner, they were still absorbing the news that Youngstown area Congressman Tim Ryan will not be running for governor next year.

Among the disappointed was state Rep. Bob Hagan.

“I think he could have won," he said. "I think it’s going to be a tough campaign – we needed someone that can shout and can scream and get people up on their feet and I think he can do that. On the other hand, I’m disappointed because, in a selfish way, I was going to run for Congress myself in his seat.”

Twenty-five months into his term, Ohio Gov. John Kasich has finally hit the “magic number.”

In politics, the magic number for an elected official seeking re-election is 50 percent or more in his or her job approval rating.


You do not want to be running for re-election with an approval rating below 50 percent. It doesn’t necessarily mean you are going to lose, but it means you have some explaining to do the voters.

Former Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland, like many seasoned election veterans, likes to help the young aspiring politicians who, in years past, helped him get where he wanted to go.


That’s what Strickland was doing in Cincinnati Friday, at the Southern Baptist Church and elsewhere, where he joined Greg Landsman, a fellow Democrat, as Landsman officially launched his run for a seat on Cincinnati City Council.
 

Pages