Ohio constitution


For 160 years, Ohio has had a public school system. Now, an appointed panel of lawmakers, former public officials and well-connected experts are examining how the Ohio constitution can resolve the debate over how to pay for it. The group is called the Constitutional Modernization Commission.  It could dramatically change language dealing with public education.


After years of complaints about the way the Ohio'ss Congressional and Statehouse districts are drawn, an appointed panel of current and former lawmakers and other officials is looking over a plan to change it. In the second of a three part series on the issues in front of the Constitutional Modernization Commission, there’s still a lot of debate over whether that plan is fair and politically balanced.

It’s hard to find anyone around Capitol Square who doesn’t think the current process for redistricting doesn’t need to be tweaked or even completely overhauled. 


For months, an appointed panel of lawmakers, former public officials and well-connected experts has been meeting to talk about what should be changed in the Ohio Constitution.  Term Limits is one of teh items on the agenda. 

Of all the major issues on the commission’s agenda, it appears the first big move will come in the form of term limit expansion.

It is widely believed that, in 2004, George W. Bush won a second term in the White House because Ohio had a constitutional amendment on the ballot banning same-sex marriage.

The electoral college contest between Bush and Democrat John Kerry, came down to Ohio. Ohio’s constitutional ban on same-sex marriage brought out evangelical Christian voters in droves – the so-called “values voters.”