Ohio

Why Ohio's Relations With Israel Matter

Mar 27, 2018
ohio israel relationship
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Last November, a 25-member delegation of Ohio state lawmakers, legislative staffers and community leaders visited Israel on a business and trade development mission. Funded by Ohio’s Jewish federations, foundations and corporate donors, the trip was designed to build better, deeper connections between the state and Israel.

Food and good places to eat are the one constant of running for public office in Ohio. Every city and town, it seems, has a restaurant, a diner, a hamburger stand that is a candidate-magnet. I've been in dozens of them in every corner of the state. This is part one of a two-part Tales from the Trail on my memories of dining on the campaign trail. Part two will follow next Saturday.

The Maid-Rite Sandwich Shoppe, Greenville

When you are on the road with a presidential candidate, campaign press aides will promise you the moon and stars to make you happy.

They promise to make sure you are fed, that you have plenty of time to file your stories, that you will have dependable transportation to get from one event to another.

They may even promise you some quality time with the candidate.

After a while, though, you learn to take these promises with a grain of salt.

Ohioans have until the end of the day Tuesday to register to vote in the November 7 election.

Wednesday begins Ohio's period of early voting, for both absentee ballots and those who wish to vote early in person at their county boards of elections.  

"The easiest way to register is actually online,'' said Sherry Poland, director of the Hamilton County Board of Elections.

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about President Trump's Elections Integrity Commission and its demand that all 50 states turn over personal information on voters. 

"Leans Republican."

That's the category where Ohio's already-churning 2018 gubernatorial race  is placed by Sabato's Crystal Ball, a highly-respected weekly politics newsletter published by director Larry J. Sabato of the University of Virginia's Center for Politics.

Ohio Department of Transportation

Ohio has its foot on the gas accelerating an effort to grow its self-driving vehicle industry. After success last fall, The Ohio Turnpike and OTTO are planning more tests this spring and summer for self-driving tractor trailers across Ohio's northern corridor.

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about Ohio's Electoral College members, who will stay in line and vote for Donald Trump. And he spoke about Ohio Gov. John Kasich - earlier this year, when he was running for president, he talked about Ohio's economic "miracle." But now he is suggesting Ohio could be headed into a recession. 

Jim Nolan/WVXU

Each Friday on Cincinnati Edition we present an in-depth discussion of the developments behind the headlines.

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The last three election cycles have been miserable for Democrats in Ohio. Hillary Clinton failed to win the state this year, and, in 2014 and 2010, the Democrats were completely shut of all of Ohio's statewide constitutional offices. Can they make a comeback in 2018's mid-term election? WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with Jay Hanselman about it on Morning Edition Monday. 

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about Ohio Gov. John Kasich, who tried and failed to win the GOP presidential nomination and then spent the rest of the campaign season turning his back on the eventual winner, Donald Trump. What does this mean for Kasich's future in politics? 

For a period of time even longer than the Chicago Cubs' 108-year drought between World Series championships, Ohio has been the bellwether of this country's presidential politics.

When Ohio went for Donald Trump on Nov. 8 it marked the 29th time in the past 31 presidential elections that Ohio went with the winner, a record unmatched by any other state in that period of time.

That's the mark of a bellwether state.

But it's not the only mark.

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik about the presidential election results in Ohio and how Donald Trump outperformed even the polls that had him with a slim lead. And Wilkinson talked, too, about how Hamilton County has gone from a red county to a purple county to a blue county. 

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about the impact Donald Trump's lewd and vulgar remarks about women in 2005 is already damaging his campaign in Ohio. 

Poor old Ohio. Once the bellwether of the nation; once the ultimate swing state in presidential elections.

Now, if you pay attention to some recent national news reports, Ohio is watching its bellwether status slip away. It is becoming the Rodney Dangerfield of American Politics, shifting its necktie and whining that it gets no respect.

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about whether or not Hillary Clinton can win the White House without winning the key battleground state of Ohio. She is trailing in the polls by a small margin in the Buckeye State. Also, Wilkinson talked about potential cyber-security threats to the voting system. 

There is a reason Ohio is called the bellwether of American presidential politics – a reason why it is watched so closely by the political professionals and the pundits every year.

Ohio is a microcosm of America, except in a few demographic categories, such as the percentage of Hispanic population – 17 percent nationwide, only 3.3 percent in Ohio.

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Kyle Kondik along with Howard Wilkinson and Mark Heyne will talk about Ohio's importance in presidential elections at the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County's downtown branch on Monday, September 19 at 7pm. Admission is free.

Ohio has been deemed the bellwether state when it comes to presidential politics, and for good reason. 

With the Republican presidential nominating convention set to start in about two weeks in Cleveland, Ohio remains a tough fight for Donald Trump, the presumptive nominee, but one that could conceivably be won.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

The Ohio Development Services Agency handed out $27.8 million in historic preservation tax credits Wednesday, but a major Cincinnati project – Union Terminal – was not on the list.

The Union Terminal restoration project had applied for $3.25 million worth of state tax credits.

 The race between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump is a dead heat at this point in the crucial swing state of Ohio, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Tuesday morning.

But the poll – which had Clinton and Trump in a flat-footed tie at 40 percent each – may be a slight improvement for the Democratic candidate, who trailed Trump by four percentage points in a Quinnipiac poll released in May.

The poll showed that women voters are moving to Clinton in greater numbers. Clinton's support among women is at 48 percent now, compared to 43 percent in May.

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about how a race between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton might play out in the critical swing state of Ohio this fall.

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the role Ohio and Kentucky are likely to play in the selection of Democratic and Republican presidential nominees.

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Ohio voters Tuesday soundly rejected a state constitutional amendment that would have legalized marijuana in Ohio and opened the door to a multi-million dollar industry growing and selling the plant.

With 97 percent of the state’s precincts reporting, 64 percent of Ohio voters were saying no to the plan, while 36 percent were saying they supported it.

Wikimedia Commons

Recent polls suggest that a majority of Ohioans back the legalization of marijuana.

But the question for Ohio voters on Nov. 3 is not whether they think marijuana should be legal. It is whether  they think Issue 3, a state constitutional amendment that would set up a large and profitable pot-producing industry owned by a handful of individuals, is the right way to do it.

  Last Monday, at the beginning of what turned out to be a not-so-hot week for Ohio’s governor, John Kasich, he said something at the opening of his New Hampshire presidential campaign headquarters that was very revealing; and very frank.

“We’ve got about 128 days to go until the New Hampshire primary,’’ the Boston Globe reported Kasich as saying. “We do well here; we’re moving on. We do terrible here; it’s over. No confusion about that. This is very, very important to us.”

Legalizing marijuana in Ohio. A new governor in Kentucky. A fiercely debated park levy in Cincinnati. And literally hundreds of other candidate races and ballot issues.

All are to be decided Nov. 3, in an “off-year” election.

  Hillary Clinton brought her presidential campaign into Ohio for the second time Thursday, holding a “Women for Hillary” rally in Columbus and two private fundraisers, one in Ohio’s capital city and another here in Cincinnati.

It was really not a very good day for the former secretary of state and U.S. Senator who remains (we guess) the front-runner for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination.

Kasich, Back In Columbus, Jokes With The Press, Does Some State Business

Sep 4, 2015
Karen Kasler/Ohio Public Radio

Ohio Gov. John Kasich was in a jovial mood when he met with reporters Thursday at the Statehouse, as he took a break from the presidential campaign trail to conduct some Ohio business.

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President Obama’s announcement that Mount McKinley in Alaska will now be called Denali piqued a lot of interest in Ohio – the home state of the president for whom the summit was named nearly a century ago.

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