Ohio

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Ohio has been deemed the bellwether state when it comes to presidential politics, and for good reason. 

With the Republican presidential nominating convention set to start in about two weeks in Cleveland, Ohio remains a tough fight for Donald Trump, the presumptive nominee, but one that could conceivably be won.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

The Ohio Development Services Agency handed out $27.8 million in historic preservation tax credits Wednesday, but a major Cincinnati project – Union Terminal – was not on the list.

The Union Terminal restoration project had applied for $3.25 million worth of state tax credits.

 The race between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump is a dead heat at this point in the crucial swing state of Ohio, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Tuesday morning.

But the poll – which had Clinton and Trump in a flat-footed tie at 40 percent each – may be a slight improvement for the Democratic candidate, who trailed Trump by four percentage points in a Quinnipiac poll released in May.

The poll showed that women voters are moving to Clinton in greater numbers. Clinton's support among women is at 48 percent now, compared to 43 percent in May.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about how a race between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton might play out in the critical swing state of Ohio this fall.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the role Ohio and Kentucky are likely to play in the selection of Democratic and Republican presidential nominees.

WVXU / via Wikimedia Commons

Ohio voters Tuesday soundly rejected a state constitutional amendment that would have legalized marijuana in Ohio and opened the door to a multi-million dollar industry growing and selling the plant.

With 97 percent of the state’s precincts reporting, 64 percent of Ohio voters were saying no to the plan, while 36 percent were saying they supported it.

Wikimedia Commons

Recent polls suggest that a majority of Ohioans back the legalization of marijuana.

But the question for Ohio voters on Nov. 3 is not whether they think marijuana should be legal. It is whether  they think Issue 3, a state constitutional amendment that would set up a large and profitable pot-producing industry owned by a handful of individuals, is the right way to do it.

  Last Monday, at the beginning of what turned out to be a not-so-hot week for Ohio’s governor, John Kasich, he said something at the opening of his New Hampshire presidential campaign headquarters that was very revealing; and very frank.

“We’ve got about 128 days to go until the New Hampshire primary,’’ the Boston Globe reported Kasich as saying. “We do well here; we’re moving on. We do terrible here; it’s over. No confusion about that. This is very, very important to us.”

Legalizing marijuana in Ohio. A new governor in Kentucky. A fiercely debated park levy in Cincinnati. And literally hundreds of other candidate races and ballot issues.

All are to be decided Nov. 3, in an “off-year” election.

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