NKU

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Homelessness is a serious and continuing problem in Greater Cincinnati, on both sides of the Ohio River. In 2013, the State of Kentucky ranked worst in the nation in the extent of child homelessness. And the number of sheltered individuals in Kenton, Boone and Campbell Counties increased by more than 60 percent in 2014.

commons.wikipedia.org

The Cincinnati Observatory Center was the first public observatory in the Western Hemisphere, and is known as “The Birthplace of American Astronomy.” Today Greater Cincinnati is home to three observatories.

Provided / Neighborhood Foundations

Going to college, raising a family, and holding down a job isn't easy.  And it's even more difficult for a single parent.  But for 48 families, there's help now.  The Scholar House has its grand opening in Newport, Wednesday.

When most people in Greater Cincinnati refer to “"the river”" they usually mean the Ohio, but the Licking River also plays a vital role in our region'’s history, environment and economy. Senior Reporting Fellow with the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism, Andy Mead, spent more than a year on and off exploring the Licking River, from its beginnings in the mountains of Kentucky more than 300 miles south of Cincinnati, to where it flows into the Ohio. His seven-part series recently ran in the Northern Kentucky Tribune, an online publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism.

The overall voter turnout rate in the presidential election of 2012 was about 58%, with the rate among young voters, those ages 18 to 29, just 45%. Even in hotly-contested presidential elections, why don’'t more eligible U.S. voters go to the polls, and how can more young people be encouraged to get engaged and vote? A day-long symposium, “I Count Because I Vote,” will be held tomorrow at Northern Kentucky University to explore the issues that impact voting, in America, and in our region.

Computers and robots that have become a bit too smart have been the driving force behind the Terminator franchise, I, Robot, The Matrix Trilogy, 2001: A Space Odyssey, and dozens of other movies. But science fiction writers aren'’t the only ones concerned about a time when your office copier is smarter than you are.

  This week the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center is hosting the “Historians Against Slavery” conference, which is designed to facilitate dialogue, scholarship and action in an effort to end modern-day slavery. Joining us to discuss the continuing problem of slavery, in the United States and throughout the world, are Dr.

  In 2009, there were approximately 500,000 veterans receiving education benefits and attending US colleges. By 2013, more than one-million student veterans were using their GI benefits to pursue advanced educational opportunities, and that number is estimated to increase by 20% in the next few years. 

Students across the country are getting ready to head-off to college campuses, many of them about to live away from home for the first time. Unfortunately, one of the new experiences they will probably have is getting sick, without mom or dad there to take them to the doctor, get their medicine, and nurse them back to health.

A Profile Of Local Jazz Saxophone Player Brian Hogg

Jul 24, 2015

Stuart Holman has a profile of local jazz musician and NKU professor, Brian Hogg.

  Terrorists have certainly existed, here and in other countries, long before September 11, 2001. But since 9-11, deaths caused by terrorist attacks worldwide have increased 60%. Even with today’s heightened vigilance and increased efforts to combat terrorism, most of us had never heard of ISIS or ISIL just a year ago. 

In what often seems like a long time ago in a galaxy far away, going to summer camp meant hiking, fishing, maybe learning how to tie knots. Fortunately those camps still exist, but along with them today are programs for kids who want to learn about digital journalism, JAVA game programming, Aeronautics, and other science and math based subjects.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

An archeological dig in eastern Clermont County is just about to end for this year.  But the dig is just the beginning of the story. 

Provided / Margaret McDiarmid and family

Along US 52, near New Richmond are the remnants of a school that played a role in American history.  Until now, that school had been largely forgotten.

But a professor at Northern Kentucky University is hoping to uncover details about the Parker Academy by unearthing its debris and bringing its story to light.

Many have loved reading the book, others painfully slogged their way through it, and some of us just saw the movie. It’'s been called “the American Bible,” Herman Mellville'’s Moby-Dick, and it comes alive this weekend with the Moby-Dick Art Fest. The four days of events kick-off this evening, and include a symposium, panel discussion, a marathon reading of the novel, and an exhibition of artworks inspired by Moby-Dick, created by Northern Kentucky University students over the past two decades.

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