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Law
2:21 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

Supreme Court Allows Stanford Ponzi Scheme Suits To Go Forward

Texas tycoon R. Allen Stanford, who conned investors in a $7 billion Ponzi scheme, arrives in custody at the federal courthouse for an Aug. 2010 hearing in Houston.
David J. Phillip AP

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 3:16 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled today that investor lawsuits may go forward against investment advisors and others for allegedly helping Texas tycoon Allen Stanford in a massive fraud.

Stanford was sentenced to 110 years in prison for bilking investors in a $7 billion Ponzi scheme. The investors who lost money are suing others involved in the scheme, contending that they also engaged in misleading conduct.

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The Two-Way
2:05 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

Ukraine Zeroes In On Leader For Interim Government

With Ukraine in a political limbo following the flight of its president Saturday, the name of Arseniy Yatsenyuk is being put forth as the country's next leader until new elections are held in May. Yatsenyuk is a member of the Batkyvshchina party, whose leaders include former prime minister Yulia Tymoshenko.

On Wednesday, a web page dedicated to Yatsenyuk announced, "Began collecting signatures under the agreement on forming a coalition. The government will be voted on Thursday," according to a web-based translation service.

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The Two-Way
2:03 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

Killers Sentenced In Hacking Death Of British Soldier

The victim: Fusilier Lee Rigby.
U.K. Ministry of Defense

One of the two men who hacked to death a British soldier on a London street in May 2013 was sentenced Wednesday to spend the rest of his life in prison. The other was given a minimum term of 45 years.

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Parallels
1:32 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

Crimea: 3 Things To Know About Ukraine's Latest Hot Spot

Crimea. It's no longer a day at the beach.
Oleg Nikishin Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 8:47 am

The unrest in Ukraine has now shifted eastward to Crimea. The region is an autonomous part of Ukraine, but with strong emotional ties to Russia and a majority of people who identify themselves as Russian.

Here is why Crimea is important to both Russia and Ukraine.

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Parallels
1:10 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

Searching For The Remains Of Egypt's Revolution

Clashes break out between rival Egyptian groups near Cairo's Tahrir square, on Jan. 25, 2014. The day marked the third anniversary of the uprising that toppled former ruler Hosni Mubarak, but the military is back in control in Egypt.
Khaled Kamel AFP/Getty Images

Just three years after protesters and the Egyptian military drove Hosni Mubarak from power, the revolution hasn't delivered what many Egyptians expected, and hopes are fading that it ever will.

Military commander Abdel Fattah al-Sisi is widely expected to announce his candidacy for president any day now. The charismatic strongman would be the frontrunner and his candidacy would be a landmark in the ongoing military crackdown now restricting many of the freedoms Egyptians hoped for when toppling Mubarak.

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