News From NPR

Middle East
7:55 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Egypt's Death Penalties Set New Standard Of Severity

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 11:27 am

This week an Egyptian court sentenced over 500 people to death. NPR's Leila Fadel tells NPR's Scott Simon that it was one of the harshest verdicts ever imposed in modern Egypt.

Religion
7:55 am
Sat March 29, 2014

The Pope And Obama Share A Knack For Inspiring The Young

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 11:27 am

President Obama met with Pope Francis this week at the Vatican. Among those watching most closely were young American Catholics.

The Salt
5:38 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Batter Up: Baseball Just Got Its Most Decorated Corn Dog

The Diamondbacks' D-bat Dog is an18-inch corn dog filled with cheese, bacon and jalapeño.
@DBACKS VIA TWITTER

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 11:27 am

Inside the kitchen of the Arizona Diamondbacks, chef Michael Snoke has created a monster: 18 inches of meat that's skewered, wrapped in cornbread, stuffed with bacon and infused with cheddar cheese and jalapeños.

All that rests on a bed of fries. And for $25, it's all yours.

"I have created the D-Bat," he says.

The Diamondback's executive chef has wanted to get in on the culinary competition that's sprung up between Major League Baseball teams.

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Sports
5:37 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Would March Be Less Mad If Players Were Paid?

Arizona guard Gabe York (1) pulls down a rebound as teammate Rondae Hollis-Jefferson (23) watches during a regional semifinal NCAA college basketball tournament game against San Diego State, Thursday in Anaheim, Calif.
Mark J. Terrill AP

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 10:44 am

Would March Madness be terribly different if the players were paid?

Probably not. The college basketball tournament might become more professionalized, but it wouldn't look much different from what we're seeing right now.

"I don't see it changing one iota," says ESPN basketball analyst Jay Bilas.

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Parallels
5:37 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Made In China — But Was It Made In A Prison?

Products produced by prison labor in China are on display at the Laogai Museum in Washington, D.C.
Shujie Leng NPR

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 10:14 am

An Oregon woman was looking at her Halloween decoration last year when she found a letter written by an inmate from one of China's re-education-through-labor camps. The letter spoke of brutal forced labor in the camp.

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