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The Two-Way
12:32 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

After Finding $40,000 In Thrift-Store Couch, Roommates Return Money

Lara Russo (from left), Cally Guasti and Reese Werkhoven found more than $40,000 stashed inside the couch they bought at a Salvation Army store.
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 2:59 pm

Many of us have stories about old couches — particularly ones we had in college, or shortly after. But not many stories are like the one three roommates in New Paltz, N.Y., can now tell.

After the trio realized their beat-up couch was stuffed with more than $40,000, they decided to return the money to its rightful owner.

It all started when roommates Reese Werkhoven, Cally Guasti and Lara Russo realized that the lumps in their couch's pillows were actually envelopes stuffed with money. Just two months earlier, they'd bought the couch for $20 at a Salvation Army store.

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Shots - Health News
12:27 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Medicare Eases Restrictions On Pricey Hepatitis C Treatment

Walter Bianco's liver is severely damaged by hepatitis C, but insurers had refused to pay for the medications that could cure him.
Alexandra Olgin for NPR

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 1:27 pm

Federal Medicare officials are embracing medical guidelines for the treatment of hepatitis C that could result in tens of thousands of older Americans getting access to expensive new drugs that can cure the deadly infection.

This policy change would pay for treatment with a combination of new, expensive drugs for patients who haven't responded to older treatment regimens and are approaching or have cirrhosis of the liver.

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Krulwich Wonders...
12:25 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

When Numbers Bleed, Freeze, Starve And Die On A Battlefield: The Dark Poetry Of Data

Roger Viollet Collection Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 4:43 pm

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Parallels
12:21 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Why The U.S. Shunned The Man Who Will Now Lead India

Narendra Modi, shown here at an April 5 campaign rally, was ostracized by the United States for more than a decade. As it became increasingly clear in recent months that he was likely to become India's next leader, the U.S. and European countries began reaching out to him.
Sam Panthaky AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 4:02 pm

Until a few months ago, the U.S. government was effectively boycotting Narendra Modi, the man who is virtually certain to be India's next prime minister following the landslide victory by his party in the country's parliamentary elections.

So will the U.S. now warm to Modi as the elected leader of the world's largest democracy?

Before answering that, let's look at why Washington refused to deal with him.

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Africa
12:11 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Wole Soyinka: I Just Want Those Monsters Exterminated

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:05 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. My thanks to Celeste Headlee for sitting in for me while I was away. And at the end of the program today, actually, I will have a word about her exciting new venture.

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