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Science
3:59 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Big Flightless Birds Come From High-Flying Ancestors

The egg definitely came before the chicken in this case — the skeleton is from a modern adult kiwi, the egg from its much bigger, long-extinct cousin, Aepyornis maximus.
Kyle Davis and Paul Scofield Canterbury Museum

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 8:06 pm

Big, flightless birds like the ostrich, the emu and the rhea are scattered around the Southern Hemisphere because their ancestors once flew around the world, a new study suggests.

That's a surprise, because it means birds in Australia, Africa and South America independently evolved in ways that made them all lose the ability to fly.

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The Two-Way
3:53 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

California Man Charged In Decade-Long Disappearance Of Teen

The home of suspect Isidro Medrano Garcia, in Bell Gardens, Calif., on Wednesday. Garcia allegedly abducted a 15-year-old girl in 2004 and held her captive for 10 years. He is charged with kidnapping and rape and is being held on $1 million bail.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 4:59 pm

A California man arrested earlier this week for the alleged 2004 abduction and sexual assault of a teenage girl whom he reportedly held against her will for the next decade has been charged with five felony counts, including rape and kidnapping.

Isidro Medrano Garcia, who was charged early Thursday, is being held on $1 million bail.

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The Two-Way
3:25 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Prosecutors: Boston Marathon Bomb Suspect 'Readily Admitted' Guilt

Boston bombings suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on April 19, 2013, as he emerged from a boat stored in a Watertown, Mass., backyard. The red dot of a police sharpshooter's laser sight can be seen on his forehead.
Mass. State Police Sgt. Sean Murphy Boston Magazine

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 5:31 pm

Prosecutors released new details about the Boston Marathon bombing in a court filing Wednesday.

They released the full text of a note that suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev wrote while hiding out and detailed the mechanisms used to detonate the bombs that killed three people and injured more than 260 others on April 15, 2013.

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The Impact of War
3:24 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Civilian Life Taught This Military Dog Some New Tricks

In this image from the June issue of National Geographic, Jose Armenta and his wife, Eliana, relax with their Boston terriers Oreo and Sassy, and Zenit, a German shepherd they adopted from the Marines.
Adam Ferguson National Geographic

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 4:59 pm

As a dog handler in the Marines, it was Jose Armenta's job to walk ahead of his platoon and search for roadside bombs with his dog, Zenit, a German shepherd trained for explosives detection and patrol. In 2011, while searching for IEDs planted by the Taliban in Afghanistan, a bomb they didn't detect exploded and Armenta was thrown 20 feet. He narrowly survived, but both his legs had to be amputated above the knee. Zenit was uninjured and redeployed with a new handler.

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The Two-Way
2:38 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

House Passes Restrictions On NSA's Collection Of Phone Records

Speaker John Boehner prepares to speak to the media after the House passed the USA Freedom Act, an NSA reform bill aimed at restricting access to Americans' phone records.
Jim Lo Scalzo EPA/Landov

Originally published on Sun June 8, 2014 2:02 pm

The House passed a measure to end the National Security Agency's bulk collection of phone records, approving a scaled-back version of legislation that was prompted by leaks from former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden.

The 303-121 vote, however "sent an unambiguous signal that both parties are no longer comfortable with giving the N.S.A. unfettered power to collect bulk surveillance data," according to The New York Times.

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