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Asia
7:46 am
Sat May 31, 2014

South Korea Repaves For A 'Woman-Friendly Seoul'

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 11:38 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Seoul, South Korea's making some changes to its urban landscape. The mayor's office says the women-friendly Seoul campaign will make the city more comfortable for women. They say a lot of urban design focused on men when they were the sole workers in a family and that's changed. So, they're installing pink painted parking spots reserved for women that are a bit wider and longer than the average spot and closer to elevators.

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The Impact of War
7:46 am
Sat May 31, 2014

With VA Hospitals Overtaxed, Vets May Have To Go Private

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 11:38 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Following General Shinseki's resignation is as head of Veterans Affairs came the questions - the big questions about how to fix the VA and who's best to lead it. NPR's Tom Bowman covers the Pentagon. He's been speaking with veterans' groups and VA watchers and joins us in our studios.

Tom, thanks so much for being with us.

TOM BOWMAN, BYLINE: You're welcome, Scott.

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The Impact of War
7:46 am
Sat May 31, 2014

New Acting VA Secretary Faces Cultural Challenges

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 11:38 am

Eric Shinseki, secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, has resigned over the growing health care scandal. He said remaining in office would only distract from carrying out needed reforms.

Shots - Health News
5:22 am
Sat May 31, 2014

Phone App Might Predict Manic Episodes In Bipolar Disorder

Manic, sad, up, down. Your voice may reveal mood shifts.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 8:31 am

There are smartphone apps for monitoring your diet, your drugs, even your heart. And now a Michigan psychiatrist is developing an app he hopes doctors will someday use to predict when a manic episode is imminent in patients with bipolar disorder.

People with the disorder alternate between crushing depression and wild manic episodes that come with the dangerous mix of uncontrollable energy and impaired judgment.

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Parallels
5:21 am
Sat May 31, 2014

Expanding The Panama Canal: The Problem Is Money, Not Mosquitoes

Men work on the Panama Canal locks near Panama City, on Feb. 21. An acrimonious financial dispute has slowed work on an expansion of the 100-year-old canal that will accommodate larger ships. The work is now expected to be completed next year.
Rodrigo Arangua AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 11:38 am

When the United States built the Panama Canal a century ago, it faced harrowing obstacles, from mudslides to malaria that killed thousands. But history doesn't appear to show a financial dispute with contractors. At least not one that halted labor on the maritime marvel.

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