News From NPR

The Two-Way
11:44 am
Tue May 27, 2014

Florida's IQ Limit For Death Penalty Isn't Constitutional, Supreme Court Says

Florida death row inmate Freddie Lee Hall challenged the state's use of an IQ cutoff to determine mental disability. The Supreme Court sided with him on Tuesday, saying Florida's law doesn't take standard errors of measurement into account.
Florida Department of Corrections/AP

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 4:53 pm

A Florida law that sets an IQ test score of 70 as a minimum in determining who's eligible for the death penalty is unconstitutional, the Supreme Court says. In a reversal of a state court's decision, the justices say Florida's rule ignores norms in the psychiatric profession. The opinion also cites the Eighth Amendment, which bars cruel and unusual punishment.

"Florida set a hard-line rule that the death penalty could not be imposed on convicted felons whose IQ is 70 or below," NPR's Washington desk says in its summary of the case.

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The Two-Way
11:40 am
Tue May 27, 2014

Obama Plans To Leave Residual Force Of 9,800 In Afghanistan

Sgt. Kyle Gonzales, a sniper with the 82nd Airborne, has a cigarette after a gun battle near the village of Babaker, Giro district, Ghazni province. The soldiers have engaged in gun battles every time they push into the hamlets north of their forward operating base.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 5:31 pm

(This post was last updated at 3:00 p.m. ET.)

President Obama announced on Tuesday a plan to leave a residual force of 9,800 service members in Afghanistan beyond 2014. By 2016, most troops will be out of the country.

"It's time to turn the page on more than a decade in which so much of our foreign policy was focused on... wars in Afghanistan and Iraq," Obama said in the White House Rose Garden.

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Tue May 27, 2014

Art In A Jar 2: Details, Details

Jim Tuttle NPR

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 11:17 am

When we posted the first Art in a Jar in April, we learned a couple of lessons: 1) Folks liked the idea. 2) The puzzle was way too easy.

So we try, try again.

The Puzzle

The challenge: Guess the masterpiece — by looking at its pieces — in the jar.

Please post your guesses in the comments section.

The Expert

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The Two-Way
11:00 am
Tue May 27, 2014

Supreme Court Rules In Favor Of Secret Service In Free Speech Case

A 2004 case involving the Secret Service made its way to the Supreme Court on Wednesday. Demonstrators wanted to sue for being moved away from then-President George W. Bush.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 5:21 pm

The Supreme Court on Tuesday ruled in a favor of Secret Service agents in a free speech case involving President George W. Bush.

The case is this: During Bush's campaign for a second term, he showed up at a restaurant in Jacksonville, Ore. Anti-Bush protesters as well as supporters showed up. Fifteen minutes after Bush decided to sit in the patio of the restaurant, the Secret Service asked police to move the anti-Bush protesters away from the restaurant and out of sight of the president.

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Shots - Health News
10:50 am
Tue May 27, 2014

States Consider Using Medicaid To Pay College Health Plan Premiums

Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., says having Medicaid pay for some students' coverage through the school health plan will give those students better options.
Alex/Flickr

Some students headed to college this fall will get top-drawer health coverage at little or no cost.

How? Medicaid, it turns out, will pay the premium for the student health plan.

Proponents say students who are eligible for Medicaid, the health insurance program for low-income people, get access to a wider network of doctors and hospitals by getting coverage through the college health plans. These broad networks can be an important consideration for students who travel for internships, international study or who return to homes far from school during the summer.

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