News From NPR

Shots - Health News
9:02 am
Tue June 3, 2014

Despite Law, Rape Victims Sometimes Pay For Medical Services

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 11:17 am

The effects of a sexual assault can be long-lasting, but the medical bills aren't supposed to be.

Yet a study published recently finds that despite federal efforts to lift that burden from rape victims, a hodgepodge of state rules mean some victims may still be charged for medical services related to rape, including prevention and treatment of pregnancy or sexually transmitted infections.

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Law
5:05 am
Tue June 3, 2014

Justice Department Renews Focus On Homegrown Terrorists

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 9:42 am

The U.S. has devoted billions of dollars to fighting terrorism overseas in the years since the Sept. 11 attacks.

The Justice Department is increasingly warning about the danger posed by radicals on American soil, and U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder wants prosecutors and FBI agents to devote more attention to the threat.

Nearly two decades ago, after the Oklahoma City bombing killed 168 people, the Justice Department launched a group to fight domestic terrorism.

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The Salt
3:31 am
Tue June 3, 2014

How Atomic Particles Helped Solve A Wine Fraud Mystery

French physicist Philippe Hubert uses gamma rays to detect radioactivity in wine. "In the wine is the story of the Atomic Age," he says.
C J Walker Courtesy of William Koch

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 7:44 am

In a laboratory, deep under a mile-high stretch of the Alps on the French-Italian border, Philippe Hubert, a physicist at the University of Bordeaux, is testing the authenticity of a bottle of wine.

"We are looking for radioactivity in the wine," says Hubert. "Most of the time the collectors send me bottles of wine because they want to know if it is fake or not."

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NPR Ed
3:29 am
Tue June 3, 2014

The Common Core Curriculum Void

Just some of the more than 700 math books that have been reviewed for Common Core alignment by professor William Schmidt and his team at Michigan State's Center for the Study of Curriculum.
Cory Turner NPR

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 9:29 am

Right now, America's schools are in a sprint. Forty-four states and the District of Columbia have adopted the Common Core State Standards. That means new learning benchmarks for the vast majority of the nation's young students — millions of kids from kindergarten through high school. And, for many of them, the Core Standards will feel tougher than what they're used to. Because they are tougher.

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Parallels
7:36 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Coup Attempts And Safaris: The Ups And Downs Of Juan Carlos' Reign

People filled the main square of Madrid on Monday after King Juan Carlos' abdication was announced.
Andres Kudacki AP

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 4:02 am

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