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The Two-Way
10:19 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Body Found Miles From Sunken South Korean Ferry

In late April, rescue workers surrounded the area where the South Korean ferry Sewol sank. The body of a victim was recovered Thursday about 25 miles from this site.
Nicolas Asfouri AFP/Getty Images

The body of a victim in the South Korean ferry disaster was retrieved Thursday, bringing the death toll to 289.

The remains were recovered 25 miles from the capsized vessel, according to The Associated Press. Fingerprints identified the body as that of a passenger who had been traveling with his family. His wife and 11-year-old son were previously found dead; his 7-year-old son was rescued, according to the wire service.

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The Two-Way
9:24 am
Thu June 5, 2014

GM Review Found 'History Of Failures' In Ignition Switch Debacle, CEO Says

General Motors Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra (center), Executive Vice President Mark Reuss (right) and President Dan Ammann discuss a review of the company's handling of a recall for a deadly ignition switch problem.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 12:05 pm

An internal inquiry into the long-delayed ignition switch recall by General Motors found an 11-year "history of failures," CEO Mary Barra says. She announced the findings of an investigation into how the company handled a deadly defect with ignition switches at a Thursday morning news conference. (updated at 12:04 p.m.: added link to full report).

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NPR Ed
9:03 am
Thu June 5, 2014

The Birds And The Bees ... And iPads

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 1:03 pm

"The talk." The facts of life. The birds and the bees. Whatever you call it, do you remember when and how you first learned about human sexuality? For me, it was a series of conversations in school and with my parents that began in third grade with the classic picture book Where Did I Come From?.

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The Two-Way
8:59 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Baseball Man Don Zimmer Dies, Ending An Epic Sports Career

Don Zimmer, manager of the Chicago Cubs, watches batting practice before the 1990 All-Star game with fellow managers Jim Leyland of the Pittsburgh Pirates, Tony LaRussa of the Oakland Athletics and Roger Craig of the San Francisco Giants at Wrigley Field.
Getty Images Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 11:34 am

His big-league career began in the 1950s and included the most recent Yankees dynasty. Along the way, the word "beloved" was often attached to his name. Baseball — the players, the fans, seemingly the sport itself — is mourning Don Zimmer today, after he died at age 83 Wednesday.

The tributes to the feisty guy with a good sense of humor and a bottomless love for the game are pouring out from all over, proof that he didn't waste any time during his 66 years in baseball. In recent years, Zimmer had been suffering from kidney and heart problems.

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The Two-Way
8:53 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Central African Republic Bans Texting, Citing Need For Order

A Muslim shopkeeper uses a mobile phone in front of his shop in the PK5 district of Bangui, the capital of the Central African Republic, on April 30. The nation, which struggles with conflict between Christian and Muslim militias, banned texting on Monday.
Issouf Sanogo AFP/Getty Images

The Central African Republic is an impoverished, troubled country. Yet many people have cell phones that are used to spread information, rumors — and to organize protests.

Authorities have now instructed cell phone providers to suspend all text message services, a ban prompted after a group attempted to organize a civil disobedience campaign through SMS messages.

Text messaging has not worked since Monday, Reuters reports.

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