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The Salt
5:29 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Sleep Less, Eat More, Gain Weight

Less sleep equals less self-control when it comes to eating, a new study finds.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 5:11 pm

Tired? Surely those cookies will help. And a burger. Chips. And a cupcake. Yeah, soda, too.

People do eat more when they're short of sleep. And that impulse to snarf when sleepy can cause quick weight gain, according to a new study.

Since Americans are chronically sleep deprived, it's no wonder that our waistlines have been expanding. One-third of American workers say they're sleeping six or fewer hours a night, compared with the seven to nine hours recommended.

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The Two-Way
5:21 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

China Calls For Rules, U.S. Calls For End Of Cyberattacks

In separate events, the Chinese and American governments called for standards regarding cyberattacks.

The New York Times reports that in a speech, today, President Obama's national security adviser, Thomas E. Donilon, called on China to takes steps to stop the attacks.

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The Salt
5:17 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Judge Overturns New York City Ban On Big Sugary Sodas

A customer fills a 21-ounce cup with soda at a New York City McDonald's.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 8:06 pm

A New York state judge has knocked down New York City's landmark new ban on big, sugary drinks, just one day before it was set to take effect.

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Around the Nation
5:17 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Owens Valley Salty As Los Angeles Water Battle Flows Into Court

Owens Lake — which dried up after losing its water source, the Owens River, to Los Angeles — is known to be a source of air pollution. The city of L.A. is in court over obligations to control dust pollution at the lake.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 6:30 pm

In the West, fights over water last a long time.

It's been almost 100 years since William Mulholland stood atop an aqueduct along the Owens River and said, "There it is, take it." He was referring to a diversion channel that started piping water to Los Angeles from 200 miles away. That water allowed L.A. to become the metropolis it is today.

But it also meant that the Owens River no longer flowed into the massive Owens Lake, which quickly dried up and became one of the biggest environmental disasters in the nation.

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It's All Politics
5:17 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Obama Team Stops Saying 'Global War On Terror' But Doesn't Stop Waging It

Standing in front of the Constitution, President Obama delivers an address on national security and terrorism in 2009 at the National Archives in Washington.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 5:36 pm

After the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, President George W. Bush often made a provocative claim: He argued that the U.S. was fighting a war without a typical battlefield. In effect, he said, this war is everywhere.

"Our enemies make no distinction based on borders," he said in a 2007 speech in Michigan. "They view the world as a giant battlefield and will strike wherever they can."

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