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The Salt
5:30 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Tiny Mites Spark Big Battle Over Imports Of French Cheese

Microscopic bugs called cheese mites are responsible for giving Mimolette its distinctive rind and flavor.
Chris Waits via Flickr

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 3:28 pm

The Food and Drug Administration is currently embroiled in a surprisingly heated culinary standoff — pitting French cheese-makers (and American cheese-lovers) against regulators, all because of one very small problem: cheese mites.

Cheese mites are microscopic little bugs that live on the surfaces of aged cheeses, munching the microscopic molds that grow there. For many aged cheeses, they're something of an industry nuisance, gently brushed off the cheeses. But for Mimolette, a bright orange French cheese, they're actually encouraged.

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The Sequester: Cuts And Consequences
5:30 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Sequester Has Air Force Clipping Its Wings

To save money, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base in North Carolina is keeping some of its pilots out of the sky.
Airman 1st Class Aubrey White U.S. Air Force

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 12:58 pm

The Pentagon says the automatic budget cuts known as sequestration could leave the U.S. with a military that is simply unprepared for the most challenging combat missions. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel told Congress in April that the military is eating its seed corn.

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Africa
5:30 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Media Focus On Ailing Mandela Is Not 'The African Way'

Congregants pray in front of a stained-glass window depicting South African statesman Nelson Mandela during Easter services at Regina Mundi Catholic Church in the Soweto of Johannesburg, South Africa, March 3. The church held prayers for Mandela, 94, who was in the hospital at the time.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 10:11 am

It's almost impossible these days to switch on South African radio or television, or read a local newspaper, website or tweet, and not hear Nelson Mandela's name mentioned.

Friday marked the 19th anniversary of Mandela's inauguration as South Africa's first democratically elected — and first black — president, four years after he was released from prison.

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The Two-Way
5:04 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Newtown Panel Votes To Build New School At Sandy Hook Site

A task force has recommended building an entirely new school in Newtown, Conn., in place of Sandy Hook Elementary School.
Julio Cortez AP

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 2:21 pm

A task force in Newtown, Conn., on Friday unanimously recommended building a brand-new school at the site where a gunman killed 26 children and teachers in December.

In January, students from Sandy Hook resumed classes, but at an unused school in a neighboring town.

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Latin America
7:23 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Former Guatemalan Dictator Found Guilty Of Genocide

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Guilty of genocide and crimes against humanity, that's the verdict today against Efrain Rios Montt, a former dictator of Guatemala. The general ruled the Central American nation in the early 1980s, one of the bloodiest periods of its 36-year-long civil war. Rios Montt, now 86 years old, was found responsible for atrocities committed against the Maya Ixil indigenous group. NPR's Carrie Kahn reports.

CARRIE KAHN, BYLINE: Presiding Judge Yasmin Barrios read the verdict to a packed audience in the expansive Supreme Court auditorium.

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