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Shots - Health News
12:03 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Top Medicare Prescribers Rake In Speaking Fees From Drugmakers

How does the doctor decide what to write on the prescription pad?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 5:38 pm

When the blood pressure drug Bystolic hit the market in 2008, it faced a crowded field of cheap generics.

So its maker, Forest Laboratories, launched a promotional assault on the group in the best position to determine Bystolic's success: those in control of prescription pads. It flooded the offices of health professionals with drug reps, and it hired doctors to persuade their peers to choose Bystolic — even though the drug hadn't proved more effective than competitors.

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All Tech Considered
5:46 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

For Modern Jurors, Being On A Case Means Being Offline

More courts are asking jurors to avoid social media services and tools that have become an integral part of modern life, like Twitter, Facebook, email, texting, instant messaging and Internet research.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 6:10 pm

In the Mercer County Courthouse in Trenton, N.J., John Saunders, a jury manager, spends his weekdays shepherding potential jurors. Much of what he tells them regards the paraphernalia of 21st century life: cellphones, tablets and laptops. These are OK to use in the waiting room, he tells them. "We realize life does not stop."

But in the courtroom, it's all phones off. Laptops and iPads stay with Saunders, and jurors are given a tag to reclaim their items. "Unlike the airport, when you return, your item will be there, and no baggage charge guaranteed," he says.

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U.S.
5:39 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

Among Conservatives, Concerns Grow Over New School Standards

Tea Party members protest Common Core in Ocala, Fla., in April. The new educational standards, adopted by almost all the states, are the object of a growing conservative backlash.
Bruce Ackerman Ocala Star-Banner /Landov

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 6:10 pm

"Common Core" is one of the biggest phrases in education today. To many educators and policymakers, it's a big, exciting idea that will ensure that America's students have the tools to succeed after graduation.

But a growing number of conservatives see things differently.

For years, states used their own, state-specific standards to lay out what K-12 students should be learning, for everything from punctuation to algebra. But those standards varied wildly, so the Common Core replaces them with one set of national standards for math and English language arts.

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The Salt
5:22 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

Our Beef With BuzzFeed's Viral Article On 8 Dangerous Foods

Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 12:42 pm

So I got an email from a publicist asking me if I was interested in what has become a tremendously popular story on BuzzFeed titled "8 Foods We Eat In The US That Are Banned In Other Countries."

Curious, I clicked, as have more than 4 million other readers.

What's my beef? Well, one of the eight bad boys of the U.S. food supply, according to the author, is arsenic.

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It's All Politics
5:10 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

IRS Chief: No Evidence Of 'Intentional Wrongdoing' So Far

Acting IRS Commissioner Danny Werfel testifies before the House Financial and General Government subcommittee in early June.
Win McNamee Getty Images

That "be on the lookout list" used to flag Tea Party groups for extra scrutiny of their tax-exemption applications?

It turns out it wasn't the only one the Internal Revenue Service had been using.

There were also other lists, covering a "broad spectrum" of categories and cases, according to a preliminary IRS report released Monday.

"Once we came to that conclusion, we took immediate action to suspend the use of these lists in the Exempt Organizations unit within IRS," said Danny Werfel, the new acting chief of the IRS, in a conference call with reporters.

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