News From NPR

The Two-Way
7:24 am
Fri June 7, 2013

'Profound Questions About Privacy' Follow Latest Revelations

The National Security Agency's headquarters in Fort Meade, Md.
NSA Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 12:32 pm

  • From 'Morning Edition': Glenn Greenwald on the data spy agencies are collecting
  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Dina Temple-Raston
  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Larry Abramson on the nation's secret court

Fresh reports about the massive amount of electronic data that the nation's spy agencies are collecting "raise profound questions about privacy" because of what they say about how such information will be collected in the future, NPR's Dina Temple-Raston said Friday on Morning Edition.

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It's All Politics
7:03 am
Fri June 7, 2013

What Else Has The Longest-Serving Congressman Outlasted?

This photo provided by Rep. John Dingell's office shows Dingell (left) being sworn in by Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn of Texas in 1955.
AP

Originally published on Sat June 8, 2013 11:44 am

Rep. John Dingell made history on Friday, when he surpassed the late Sen. Robert Byrd's record to become the longest-serving member of Congress.

The Michigan Democrat was first elected to the House of Representatives in December 1955, during the first Eisenhower administration. As of Friday, he's served 57 years, five months and 26 days.

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Planet Money
3:34 am
Fri June 7, 2013

How To Sell Coke To People Who Have Never Had A Sip

Lam Thuy Vo NPR

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 3:05 pm

For years, there were only three countries in the world that didn't officially sell Coca-Cola: Cuba, North Korea and Myanmar, formerly known as Burma.

Now, after 60 years, Coke is back in Myanmar. Sanctions were lifted last year on the country. Just this week, Coca-Cola opened its new bottling plant outside of Yangon. Now all the company has to do is figure out a way to sell all that Coke to people who may not remember what it tastes like.

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The Salt
3:26 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Not Everyone Cheers Turkey's Move To Tighten Alcohol Rules

Diners drinking raki, a traditional Turkish alcoholic drink flavored with anise, at a restaurant in Istanbul.
Jodi Hilton for NPR

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 4:46 am

The ongoing anti-government protests in Turkey are about a lot of things — including a recent law to restrict the advertising and sale of alcohol. The limits aren't any more onerous than those in some other Western countries, but secular Turks see them as another step in a push by the ruling party to impose conservative social values on the population

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Law
3:25 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Former Mass. Chief Justice On Life, Liberty And Gay Marriage

Chief Justice Margaret Marshall asks petitioner to explain a point during arguments before the Supreme Judicial Court in Boston in 2005.
George Rizer AP

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 1:56 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court, on the brink of issuing two same-sex-marriage decisions, is facing a question that Margaret Marshall had to resolve for her state a decade ago, as chief justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. Her decision became the first to legalize same-sex marriage in the United States.

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