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The Two-Way
11:13 am
Wed September 18, 2013

'I Killed A Man' Video Confessor Pleads Guilty

An image from the video confession of Matthew Cordle.
becauseisaidiwould.com AP

Matthew Cordle, the 22-year-old Ohio man whose online video confession to having killed a man while driving drunk went viral earlier this month, formally pleaded guilty Wednesday to aggravated vehicular homicide.

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Asia
11:06 am
Wed September 18, 2013

China's Debate: Must The Party Follow The Constitution?

A police officer blocks photos from being taken outside Zhongnanhai, the central headquarters for the Communist Party of China, in Beijing last year.
Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:01 pm

Several weeks back, officials with the East China University of Political Science and Law met one of its professors, Zhang Xuezhong, at his favorite hangout, a coffeehouse in Shanghai.

Sitting in a private room, they told him he was suspended from teaching for articles he had posted on the Internet. In them, Zhang had argued that China's government needs to build a real rule of law — one to which even the party is accountable — as well as a system of checks and balances.

One way to start, he says, is to live up to the promises made in China's 1982 constitution.

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The Two-Way
10:14 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Several Deaths Reported After Train Hits Bus In Ottawa

Officials monitor the scene of a crash between a passenger train en route to Toronto and a double-decker bus at a crossing in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada on Wednesday.
Stephen Morrison EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 12:23 pm

A passenger train hit a passenger bus at a railroad crossing around 8:48 a.m ET Wednesday in Canada's capital city and there were fatalities.

Canadian Broadcasting reported initially that "Ottawa fire officials say preliminary figures show 5 dead in bus-train collision. #ViaRail tweets nobody seriously hurt on train."

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Parallels
10:09 am
Wed September 18, 2013

More Old People, Fewer Workers: Nations Look To Immigration

A man relaxes at a downtown park in Seoul. The pronounced demographic shift triggered by a plummeting birth rate and soaring life expectancy is seen as one of the greatest challenges facing Asia's fourth-largest economy.
Kim Jae-Hwan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 5:43 pm

A story in the Financial Times caught our eye this week. It was on foreign workers in South Korea.

The story looked at the town of Ansan, where about 7.6 percent of the population is foreign. They come from other Asian countries, as well as from Russia. Here's one of the reasons for the change in South Korea, a highly homogeneous society:

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The Two-Way
9:30 am
Wed September 18, 2013

$64,000 Raised So Far For Homeless Man Who Turned In $42,000

Glen James, a homeless man who found $42,000 and turned it in to police, after he was honored for his honesty earlier this week by Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis (in background).
Steven Senne AP

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 12:05 pm

This week's feel-good story of the homeless man in Boston who found a backpack containing $42,000 in cash and travelers checks and then turned it into authorities is developing into an even better tale.

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