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Politics
2:19 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Navy Yard Tragedy Unnerves Mass Shooting Survivors

A small group holds a candlelight vigil Monday on Washington's Freedom Plaza to remember the victims of the D.C. Navy Yard shooting.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 3:12 pm

They never quite get over it.

Whenever there's a mass shooting, a tragedy that occurs with depressing frequency, survivors of earlier events have their own memories brought back vividly and horribly.

Kristina Anderson, one of dozens of people who was shot at Virginia Tech in 2007, now works across the river from Washington, D.C. When the news of the Navy Yard shootings there broke on Monday, her day melted into tears.

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The Two-Way
2:10 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Greek PM Denounces Neo-Nazi Party After Musician's Murder

Police escort a neo-Nazi suspect in connection with the fatal stabbing of a 34-year-old hip-hop artist.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 3:41 pm

Greece's premier has vowed not to let a neo-Nazi party undermine democracy after the killing of a Greek hip-hop and rap singer by a right-wing extremist.

"This government is determined not to let the descendants of the Nazis poison our social life or commit crimes," Antonis Samaras said in a national television address.

An extremist with possible ties to the right-wing Golden Dawn party has admitted to stabbing to death musician Pavlos Fyssas, who goes by the stage name Killah P. The incident has sparked outrage among many Greeks.

The Associated Press writes:

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The Salt
2:03 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

'Mountain Dew Mouth' Is Destroying Appalachia's Teeth, Critics Say

Appalachia has a distinct culture of sipping soda constantly throughout the day. "Here in West Virginia, you see people carrying around bottles of Mountain Dew all the time — even at a public health conference," says public health researcher Dana Singer.
Jin Lee Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 11:50 am

Obesity. Diabetes. By now, we've all heard of the health risks posed by drinking too much soda.

But over in Appalachia, the region that stretches roughly from southern New York state to Alabama, the fight against soda is targeting an altogether different concern: rotted teeth.

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Parallels
1:32 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Youth Interrupted: Myanmar's Underage, Illiterate Workers

A child carries a basket of stones while unloading a quarry boat with adult workers at a port in Yangon, Myanmar, last year. The U.N. says more than a third of the country's children have jobs.
Alexander F. Yuan AP

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 6:07 pm

Little King can't read or write. Little King can't tell you the name of his country's president.

But he's sturdy enough to balance heavy, spine-bending bundles of cargo atop his skull. Strong enough to tug dinghies loaded with bananas across the Yangon River's mucky banks at low tide.

Down by the docks, where men work like mules, Little King can earn $3 per day. He is a breadwinner, the primary supporter of a woman he adores and her two children.

But that woman is his mother. Those children are his sisters. Little King is just a kid.

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All Tech Considered
1:07 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

How To Spot And Outfake Bogus Twitter Followers

A hashtag in the digital age.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 3:15 pm

If you're on Twitter, you might want to think twice before bragging about all those followers you've been racking up. Some of the people who follow you might be fake — and there are now websites designed to expose them.

NPR's product manager for social media, Kate Myers, talks to Tell Me More's Michel Martin about how to spot fake accounts, why they might be following you and what you can do to stop them.


Interview Highlights

On tallying fake Twitter followers

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