News From NPR

Shots - Health News
6:45 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

Skip The Stirrups: Doctors Rethink Yearly Pelvic Exams

First-year medical student Michelle Gentile assists her classmate Abbie Harts as she performs a pelvic exam on a volunteer at Northwestern University.
Joshua Lott Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 4:57 pm

The American College of Physicians said Monday that it strongly recommends against annual pelvic exams for healthy, low-risk women.

In fact, the intrusive exams may do more harm than good for women who aren't pregnant or don't have signs of problems, a group of doctors wrote in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Read more
Business
6:41 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

How Many Companies Will Be Touched By Court's Contraception Ruling?

The Supreme Court said protecting the free-exercise rights of owners of corporations, such as Hobby Lobby Stores, protects religious liberty.
Ed Andrieski AP

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 6:46 pm

When the Supreme Court ruled Monday that "closely held" corporations don't have to pay for workers' contraception, you may have assumed the decision applied only to family-owned businesses.

Wrong. An estimated 9 out of 10 businesses are "closely held."

However, some benefits experts question just how many of those companies would want to assert religious views.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:28 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

BNP Paribas Agrees To Pay $8.83 Billion In Sanctions Probe

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 8:00 pm

Representatives for the French bank BNP Paribas pleaded guilty on Monday and agreed to pay $8.83 billion over allegations that it violated U.S. sanctions laws by facilitating transactions involving Sudan, Cuba and Iran.

The Wall Street Journal reports:

Read more
News
6:20 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

BNP Paribas Agrees To Nearly $9 Billion Fine And Admission Of Guilt

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 7:30 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Banking giant BNP Paribas has agreed to pay American regulators nearly $9 billion dollars to settle charges of economic sanctions violations. It's the largest such fine ever imposed by the U.S. The bank will plead guilty to two criminal charges. It was accused of helping clients in Sudan, Cuba and Iran conduct business in the United States. NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

Read more
All Tech Considered
5:16 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

An Algorithm Is A Curator At The Sept. 11 Museum

"Timescape" finds words in the news associated with Sept. 11, and weights them according to prominence in a story — not just how often they appear.
Gaurav Bradoo

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 4:34 pm

Sept. 11, 2001, means many things — and conflicting things — to each of us. Charged emotions, and debates over a history that's still so recent, made it really hard to design the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in Lower Manhattan. It was so difficult, in fact, that museum curators decided to try something quite new. They decided to hand off major curatorial duties to a computer algorithm.

Analytic Stop In An Emotional Journey

Read more

Pages