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The Two-Way
4:27 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Jobs Numbers Buoy Dow Above 17,000 For The First Time

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 4:52 pm

The Dow Jones closed above 17,000 for the first time in its history on Thursday. The index was buoyed by better-than-expected news from the jobs market.

As we reported, the Labor Department announced that U.S. employers added 288,000 jobs last month and that the unemployment rate dipped to 6.1 percent.

It was the fifth consecutive month that employers had added more than 200,000 jobs.

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The Two-Way
4:13 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Colombia Gives Federal Workers Afternoon Off To Watch Soccer Match

A Colombia soccer fan holds up his dog and celebrates a goal against Uruguay as he watches the World Cup round of 16 match on TV with others in Bogota, Colombia on Saturday.
Javier Galeano AP

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 4:50 pm

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos is giving government workers the afternoon off on Friday, so they can watch their national team in the quarter finals of the World Cup.

The BBC reports:

"The progress of Colombia to the quarter-finals has sent the country into a state of national euphoria.

"But after a spike in domestic violence after Colombia's first win, the sale of alcohol will be banned on match day.

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Middle East
4:09 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Iran Nuclear Negotiations Try To Hurdle Impasse As Deadline Nears

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 6:26 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Iranian and American diplomats are facing a July 20th deadline to come up with a nuclear agreement. A deal could prevent any Iranian attempt to build a bomb. Failure could bring back the mutual hostility of the past. As NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Vienna, nuclear fuel, uranium, is the crucial issue.

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Politics
4:09 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Lawmakers' Step Back Toward Disclosure Driven By Optics

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 6:26 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The House Ethics Committee is undoing a recent change it made to lawmakers' annual financial disclosure forms. The committee had deleted a line asking what free trips members have taken in the previous year. These trips are usually paid for by companies or private interest groups. Members justified the change this week, saying that the information was redundant. But they've now decided to reverse course and put the question back. Joining us from the Capitol to explain this is NPR's Laura Sullivan. And Laura, what started this controversy?

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Business
4:09 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Export-Import Controversy Gives Rise To A Tale Of Two Washingtons

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 6:26 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. A debate has been raging in Washington, D.C. over the future of an obscure federal agency - the Export-Import Bank. And all the way across the country in the other Washington - Washington state - businesses, labor unions and politicians say the bank's demise would have severe consequences. Ashley Gross of member station KPLU in Seattle reports.

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