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The Salt
4:45 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Potential Carcinogen In Colas Has FDA Reviewing Data

4-MEI, a chemical created during the manufacturing of caramel color used to dye sodas brown, is under new scrutiny.
iStockphoto

A new study from Consumer Reports finds varying levels of a chemical compound classified as a possible human carcinogen in many popular brands of soda.

The findings have prompted the Food and Drug Administration to take a new look at the compound, 4-methylimidazole — or 4-MEI for short. It is found in the caramel color that soda makers use to dye the drinks brown.

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Shots - Health News
4:13 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Texas Issues Tough Rules For Insurance Navigators

Cedric Anthony and Alysia Greer are two of the navigators working in Houston neighborhoods for United Labor Unions Local 100.
Carrie Feibel

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 5:30 pm

Texas has imposed strict new regulations on the insurance helpers, or navigators, who work in the community to enroll people in health plans under the Affordable Care Act.

The navigators must register with the state, undergo a background check and fingerprinting, and complete 20 hours of additional training — beyond the 20 to 30 hours of federal training they've already received.

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The Two-Way
4:09 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

South Sudan Signs Cease-Fire With Rebels

South Sudan's government-delegation leader Nhial Deng Nhial (left) and the rebel-delegation leader Taban Deng Gai shake hands after signing a cease-fire agreement in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, on Thursday.
STR EPA /Landov

A cease-fire deal has been reached between the government of the nascent country of South Sudan and rebel forces to end five weeks of fighting that has claimed more than 10,000 lives.

The agreement for a countrywide cease-fire was signed Thursday in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa. NPR's Gregory Warner, reporting from Bukavu in the neighboring Democratic Republic of Congo, says the deal marks a breakthrough in peace talks that stalled for weeks over the fate of 11 political prisoners under house arrest by the South Sudanese government.

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Asia
3:50 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Jailed In North Korea: 5 Americans Who Got Out

Freed U.S. journalist Laura Ling (center) speaks after she and her sister, fellow journalist Euna Lee (3rd from right), arrived in Burbank, Calif., from North Korea on Aug. 5, 2009. After talks in Pyongyang with former U.S. President Bill Clinton (left), then-North Korean leader Kim Jong Il pardoned the women, who were sentenced to hard labor for entering the country illegally.
Gabriel Bouys AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 3:42 pm

Since the Korean War, which ended in 1953, no American has been imprisoned in North Korea as long as 45-year-old Korean-American missionary Kenneth Bae.

Bae was arrested in November 2012 and later convicted for supposedly attempting to overthrow the state through a plot called Operation Jericho, described in videotaped sermons.

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Shots - Health News
3:30 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Contagious Cancer In Dogs Leaves Prehistoric Paw Prints

The sexually transmitted cancer is common in street dogs around the world.
Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 27, 2014 12:36 pm

Our four-legged friends suffer from many of the same cancers that we do. But one type of dog tumor acts like no other: It's contagious.

The tumor spreads from one pooch to another when the dogs have sex or even just touch or lick each other.

"It's a common disease in street dogs all around the world," says geneticist Elizabeth Murchison at the University of Cambridge. "People in the U.S. and U.K. haven't heard of it because it's found mostly in free-roaming dogs in developing countries."

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