News From NPR

News From NPR

Living on the streets is tough enough in a city. But when you're homeless in rural America, it's even harder to pull yourself out of poverty.

In the small town of Flagstaff, Ariz., one woman tried to make a difference, and flipped an old motel into transitional housing.

When former financial planner Lori Barlow moved to Flagstaff, she volunteered at the emergency shelter. She was overwhelmed by the number of people stuck in poverty.

Building A New Community For The Rural Homeless

1 hour ago

Most of the time when we talk about homelessness, big cities come to mind. But about seven percent of homeless people live in rural areas, where access to help is much harder to come by. Flagstaff, Ariz. is one of those places. While city officials work to find solutions, one woman has taken an old motel and turned it into transitional housing.

There's football season, hunting season, and the holiday season. Overlapping all of these is something decidedly less fun and sexy: open enrollment season for health insurance.

"We've been busy this past month," says Iris Galvez, a health insurance navigator with the Houston social services agency Change Happens!

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

From Washington Desk correspondent Brian Naylor

I have a soft spot in my heart for the New Hampshire primary. (I'm writing this from my Manchester hotel room.)

Facebook is changing its policies to ban users from arranging the private sale of guns on both Facebook and Instagram.

The new rules, first reported Friday, are stricter than Facebook's previous stance on gun sales, which allowed users to arrange such sales under some restrictions as long as they did not use Facebook ads.

The ban on person-to-person firearm sales comes after pressure from the Obama administration, state attorneys general and gun safety advocates, NPR's Laura Sydell reported for our Newscast unit.

A U.S. Navy warship sailed close to a disputed island in the South China Sea on Saturday, challenging maritime claims by China, Taiwan and Vietnam.

The trip near Triton Island, first reported by the Wall Street Journal, is what the Pentagon calls a "freedom of navigation operation."

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz is known for being one of the most disliked men in Washington. As he tries to win over voters, his wife Heidi Cruz is trying to vouch for his character and show people that he has a softer side.

At least 37 migrants have drowned after a ship sank in the Aegean Sea on the way to Greece, the Turkish Coast Guard says. The coast guard was able to save 75 people and continues to look for more survivors.

At least 10 children were among the dead, including four toddlers or infants, The Associated Press reports. The victims were mostly Syrians.

Three teenage boys are lugging boxes of donated shoes into a stately neoclassical home in Mytilini, the capital of the Greek island of Lesbos.

Two of the boys are Syrian, and the other is Algerian. For the moment, they live in this house, a shelter for underage asylum-seekers traveling alone.

Inside, Christina Dimakou, a high-energy young lawyer, greets them. "Kalimera!" she says, Greek for "good day" and flashes a smile. The boys repeat the word, giggling.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Bravo. Time for sports.

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