neighborhoods

Provided

The Neighborhood Economics Conference will be held November 17 and 18 at Xavier University. The conference is designed to highlight the importance, and foster the growth, of the economy at the local, neighborhood level, in order to enact positive changes in communities.

This interview originally aired May 8, 2015.

The new book, Walking Cincinnati, by Danny Korman and Katie Meyer, is a guide through the historical, architectural, and culinary sites in Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. The book focuses on the human-interest stories connected with the places noted along the book’s 32 walking tours, and unveils some of the more fascinating aspects of Greater Cincinnati. 

Incorporated on March 15, 1870, Bellevue, Kentucky, just across the Ohio from Cincinnati, sits on land originally granted to General James Taylor. The city of approximately 6,000 went through years of rough economic times, but in the mid-1980s city leaders and residents focused on historic preservation and began an era of new economic development, job growth and new businesses opening in the city. 

Provided

  Once an important military site and a heavily industrial area, Camp Washington may be best known today for the iconic chili parlor that has operated there for 75 years. But the neighborhood, annexed to the City of Cincinnati in 1869, is so much more, including residents with a strong sense of community who take pride in making their neighborhood a good place to work and live. 

Provided, City of Cincinnati

NOTE: This program originally aired April 9, 2014.

NOTE: This program originally aired on April 9, 2014.

Price Hill Will has been working hard to create a more vibrant and livable neighborhood on Cincinnati’s westside. They recently award grants to five cultural events, so in the studio with Barbara Gray are Diana Vakharia from Price Hill Will and community activist Mike Moroski to talk about these events and other community activities.

Provided/City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati's proposed budget cuts funding for a program that guides revitalization and growth activities in some of the city's neighborhood business districts.  

The all-volunteer group has received about $1 to $3 million a year from the city for many years.  But the currently proposed spending plan cuts a large chunk of city capital money for Cincinnati Neighborhood Business District United.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

The numbers point to a safer Cincinnati, but the perception for many is that some neighborhoods still aren't. Just today District Three Police Captain Dan Gerard took members of the Board of Realtors on a tour of Price Hill, where crime is at its lowest in ten years.

The 12th Annual Cincinnati Neighborhood Summit, presented by Invest in Neighborhoods, takes place on Saturday, February 22 at Xavier University's Cintas Center and features many workshops and presentations designed to help community leaders and volunteers improve their neighborhoods and to make them healthier, more attractive and vibrant.

The Summit has enlisted the help of experts and professionals to teach participants some best practices. The sessions are intended for individuals fairly new to neighborhood activity as well as for those who have more experience.

Cincinnati officials have announced that East Price Hill and Walnut Hills have been selected for this year’s Neighborhood Enhancement Program.  

The two areas were selected based on a number of factors.  Those include: building code violations, vacant buildings, disorder and drug calls for police service and drug arrests, as well as graffiti, junk cars, litter and weeds.

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell and his district commanders will host members of the public at town hall meetings in all five of Cincinnati's police districts, beginning Wednesday night.

Blackwell, a former assistant police chief in Columbus, took over the Cincinnati Police Department in September.

Hamilton County Engineering

Jay Hanselman

Cincinnati officials will be discussing a new plan Wednesday morning that will use technology to better communicate with residents in the city's 52 neighborhoods.  

The city is partnering with Nextdoor.  

The website has been operating since October 2011 and has about 16,000 neighborhoods represented nationwide.

Communications Director Kelsey Grady said Nextdoor is a private social network that allows neighbors to connect.

  Form Based Code is a different way to look at neighborhood planning and zoning that focuses on the physical character of buildings, the relationship of buildings to each other, and to the street. Jay Hanselman talks with Vice-Mayor Roxanne Qualls about how this new method of zoning will shape Cincinnati Neighborhoods.

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