neighborhood development

Provided, Price Hill Will

Price Hill is known for more than just its famous chili; it’'s a neighborhood in the midst of revitalization with renovated homes, young musicians and community gardens emerging. This is in part thanks to Price Hill Will, a non-profit community development agency that has been working to renew East, West and Lower Price Hill for more than a decade, incorporated in 2004.

Incorporated on March 15, 1870, Bellevue, Kentucky, just across the Ohio from Cincinnati, sits on land originally granted to General James Taylor. The city of approximately 6,000 went through years of rough economic times, but in the mid-1980s city leaders and residents focused on historic preservation and began an era of new economic development, job growth and new businesses opening in the city. 

Cincinnati Magazine

Westwood is the city's largest neighborhood in terms of its geographical size, and it's the most heavily populated at 30,000 residents. At one point, it was a crossroads for commerce moving in and out of the city, a place where many large and fashionable homes were built. But, with changes in the city's zoning code in the 1970's and older generations dying off and younger generations moving out, Westwood has seen blight move in.

Provided, City of Cincinnati

NOTE: This program originally aired April 9, 2014.

NOTE: This program originally aired on April 9, 2014.

Provided from City of Cincinnati

A railroad company is rejecting Cincinnati's request to reduce train horn noise in the city's Hartwell neighborhood and other nearby communities.  

CSX Transportation said in a June letter to the city's transportation and engineering department it will not approve the use of wayside horns along it tracks running through Hartwell.  It would have also benefited Wyoming, Lockland, Woodlawn and Glendale.  

 

Provided/City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati's proposed budget cuts funding for a program that guides revitalization and growth activities in some of the city's neighborhood business districts.  

The all-volunteer group has received about $1 to $3 million a year from the city for many years.  But the currently proposed spending plan cuts a large chunk of city capital money for Cincinnati Neighborhood Business District United.

Provided from City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati Council could approve a report next month that would let the city move forward with a plan to reduce the noise freight trains make when traveling through some neighborhoods.  The idea is to set-up a quiet zone especially for overnight train traffic.

  Form Based Code is a different way to look at neighborhood planning and zoning that focuses on the physical character of buildings, the relationship of buildings to each other, and to the street. Jay Hanselman talks with Vice-Mayor Roxanne Qualls about how this new method of zoning will shape Cincinnati Neighborhoods.

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