neighborhood development

Provided, Price Hill Will

Price Hill is known for more than just its famous chili; it’'s a neighborhood in the midst of revitalization with renovated homes, young musicians and community gardens emerging. This is in part thanks to Price Hill Will, a non-profit community development agency that has been working to renew East, West and Lower Price Hill for more than a decade, incorporated in 2004.

Incorporated on March 15, 1870, Bellevue, Kentucky, just across the Ohio from Cincinnati, sits on land originally granted to General James Taylor. The city of approximately 6,000 went through years of rough economic times, but in the mid-1980s city leaders and residents focused on historic preservation and began an era of new economic development, job growth and new businesses opening in the city. 

Cincinnati Magazine

Westwood is the city's largest neighborhood in terms of its geographical size, and it's the most heavily populated at 30,000 residents. At one point, it was a crossroads for commerce moving in and out of the city, a place where many large and fashionable homes were built. But, with changes in the city's zoning code in the 1970's and older generations dying off and younger generations moving out, Westwood has seen blight move in.

Provided, City of Cincinnati

NOTE: This program originally aired April 9, 2014.

NOTE: This program originally aired on April 9, 2014.

Provided from City of Cincinnati

A railroad company is rejecting Cincinnati's request to reduce train horn noise in the city's Hartwell neighborhood and other nearby communities.  

CSX Transportation said in a June letter to the city's transportation and engineering department it will not approve the use of wayside horns along it tracks running through Hartwell.  It would have also benefited Wyoming, Lockland, Woodlawn and Glendale.  

 

Provided/City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati's proposed budget cuts funding for a program that guides revitalization and growth activities in some of the city's neighborhood business districts.  

The all-volunteer group has received about $1 to $3 million a year from the city for many years.  But the currently proposed spending plan cuts a large chunk of city capital money for Cincinnati Neighborhood Business District United.

Provided from City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati Council could approve a report next month that would let the city move forward with a plan to reduce the noise freight trains make when traveling through some neighborhoods.  The idea is to set-up a quiet zone especially for overnight train traffic.

  Form Based Code is a different way to look at neighborhood planning and zoning that focuses on the physical character of buildings, the relationship of buildings to each other, and to the street. Jay Hanselman talks with Vice-Mayor Roxanne Qualls about how this new method of zoning will shape Cincinnati Neighborhoods.

Jay Hanselman

Many people have watched as the Broadway Commons was transformed from a parking lot into a $400 million casino complex that is planning to open its doors to the public next Monday.

What they may not have noticed is that the casino project has transformed the long-neglected neighborhood of Pendleton, just across Reading Road from Horseshoe Casino.

Over the Rhine Chamber

Nov 16, 2012

The renaissance of Cincinnati’s Over the Rhine neighborhood has been extraordinary, from the Gateway District to Washington Park and all points in between. Joining Mark Perzel with an update of OTR’s growth and future plans, along with a look at some of the many holiday happenings taking place, are Emilie Johnson, president of the OTR Chamber, and Bobby Maly, a member of the OTR Chamber board.


A city attorney said officials are working to aggressively enforce a tougher chronic nuisance ordinance Council approved last year. 

Mark Manning started in March and works in the District One police headquarters. 

He spoke to a Council committee last week. 

A property is declared a chronic nuisance once crime and disorder there reaches a certain level.  The goal is to hold the owner responsible for those problems. 

The 2012 Northside House Tour, presented by the Northside Community Council, starts at noon Sunday and includes many homes and businesses that have remodeled and refurbished, showing the possibilities that exist in some of Cincinnati’s older neighborhoods. The tour begins at Churches Active in Northside (4230 Hamilton Avenue)…check the website for all the ticket information.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati's Economic Development Director is asking Council to use some the expected casino tax revenues to fund business growth in city neighborhoods. 

Odis Jones made a presentation Tuesday to a joint meeting of the Budget and Finance and Strategic Growth Committees. 

Jones is seeking $4 million for what's called a “Focus 52” Bond Pool.

“To provide capital via loans or via direct investment into projects within the neighborhoods that continue to spur investment and job creation,” Jones said.

Pages