neighborhods

The summer months bring a plethora of community festivals, but for Cincinnati's largest neighborhood, Westwood's Second Saturday block parties are the place to be. 

Cincinnati's Northside community embraces its diverse population, and two local human service agencies are teaming up to better support the neighborhood. 

Looking Ahead To A Busy Summer Of Fun In Price Hill

Apr 28, 2017

There are a wealth of events happening in Price Hill, thanks in great part to the community development efforts of the organization Price Hill Will

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There are 52 diverse neighborhoods in Cincinnati, from Price Hill to Hyde Park, each with its own distinctive community feel. The Cincinnati Neighborhood Summit was created and designed to bring all of these neighborhoods together to improve the city as a whole. 

Mikki Schaffner Photography

Cincinnati is replete with the arts, from museums to dance to theater to music. 

Soapbox Media/Scott Beseler

To launch its On the Ground series of reports on Cincinnati neighborhoods, writers and editors for Soapbox Media have spent the last several months looking at the past, present and future possibilities of Walnut Hills, one of Cincinnati's oldest neighborhoods. 

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Madisonville got its start in 1809 as Madison, named after the fourth president of the United States, James Madison. 

www.flickr.com, available for use

Spring Grove Village borders several neighborhoods such Northside and Clifton and is known for Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum, which is the second largest cemetery in the country. 

Wikipedia, available for use (fast food)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture defines food deserts as areas – often impoverished – devoid of healthy foods such as fresh fruits and vegetables.

Pixabay, available for use (fruits and vegs)

While some neighborhoods in Cincinnati may be lacking in access to healthy foods, there are various community-based efforts being made to overcome what have been called food deserts. The stores that do provide fresh fruits and vegetables, among other options, set an example and bring change to communities in need.

Cincinnati Northside - Facebook page

Northside is known for being a quirky local neighborhood, rich in the arts and with a tradition of community activism; it’'s a walkable, urban location with a small town feel. Popular spots include record shops, community spaces and vintage stores.

Flickr, available for use

Over-the-Rhine has experienced a remarkable transformation during the last decade. It will soon get a new entertainment district that could double the amount of bars and restaurants in the area. The real estate market is one of the most sought after in the city, and the number of affordable housing units have decreased.

Provided

Cincinnati'’s 52 diverse neighborhoods are coming together for a first-ever competition: the Cincinnati Neighborhood Games. All residents, regardless of age and economic status, are welcome to participate in up to 20 events, such as the 40-yard dash, hula-hoop endurance, limbo, chess and ping pong.

There has been much economic development in Downtown and Over-the-Rhine.  Now some are trying to get more of that business activity into the city's other neighborhoods.  

A two-day conference on that topic begins Tuesday at Xavier University.  The goal is to highlight the importance, and foster growth, of the economy at the neighborhood level.

  A group working to establish a co-op grocery store in Clifton announced last week that it had signed an agreement to purchase the old Keller’s IGA building at 319 Ludlow Ave. Now the group is working towards raising the funds needed to open the Clifton Market

  There are more than 50 neighborhoods within the City of Cincinnati, each with its own charms and challenges. The 2015 Neighborhood Summit is a gathering of engaged residents who recognize the value of working together to make all of the city’'s neighborhoods stronger, more welcoming places to live.

Howard Wilkinson

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley promised a lot of action in his first State of the City address Thursday night - less gun violence, a greater emphasis on basic services to the neighborhoods and a reduction in the number of Cincinnati residents living in poverty, among other things.

And, Cranley promised, a city that is even more fun to live in than it is now. He went so far as to say he is appointing an unpaid, volunteer “Commissioner of Fun” for the city.

Cincinnati Council could vote this week to approve an extension of the Lytle Park Historic District.  It was first granted in 1964 and is set to expire in August.  

The extension will cover a smaller geographic area, which includes removing some buildings on Broadway between East Fourth and Arch Streets.  Previously those were in a less restrictive part of the historic district known as Area B.