Mitch McConnell

rand paul
J. Tyler Franklin / WFPL

Rand Paul still says he will vote against the confirmation of Gina Haspel to be the next director of the CIA, citing her role in the intelligence agency’s brutal interrogation program more than a decade ago.

mitch mcconnell
Lisa Gillespie / WFPL

Kentucky employers and addiction treatment providers are throwing their weight behind Senator Mitch McConnell’s opioid bill introduced last week in the U.S. Senate.

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky has introduced a bill aimed at addressing the impact the opioid epidemic is having on the nation’s workforce.

The Comprehensive Addiction Recovery through Effective Employment and Reentry, or CAREER Act, creates a pilot program focused on the states most devastated by substance abuse. The legislation encourages local businesses and treatment groups to form partnerships. McConnell said having stable employment is about more than a paycheck and supporting a family.

mitch mcconnell
United States Congress/Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

A poll released this month by Western Kentucky University suggests that Mitch McConnell is the least popular among the state’s two Republican U.S. Senators.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell admits there is a debate within the Republican party over President Donald Trump's call for tariffs. Speaking before the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce Tuesday, McConnell says personally he falls squarely on the side of fair trade.

Kentucky's Fancy Farm: Chopped Mutton, Politicians Hurling Insults

Aug 3, 2015
Rob Canning

For some in Western Kentucky, the annual Fancy Farm Picnic is about chopped mutton and pork, bingo and music.

But for the rest of the state it’s that weekend in August when politicians roll up their shirt sleeves and yell into a sea of cheers and boos.

U.S. Congress

An icon of Kentucky politics, former governor and U.S. Senator Wendell Ford, has died at the age of 90 at his Owensboro home.

Ford, whose political career in Kentucky spanned four decades, was diagnosed last year with a malignancy on one of his lungs and had been undergoing chemotherapy treatments.

The Owensboro Democrat represented the Commonwealth of Kentucky in the U.S. Senate for a quarter of a century, from 1974 until 1999.

Kentucky Senator Mitch McConnell made a stop in the commonwealth Thursday. He spoke at the Northern Kentucky Area Development District's annual meeting.

Much of his speech focused on why he should be re-elected this November, but he began by addressing the region's heroin epidemic.

"It's the scourge of our rather affluent society," says McConnell, "but I think continuing to double down and cooperate at all levels of government is absolutely essential."

McConnell says Northern Kentucky remains the epicenter of the epidemic.

Official Portrait

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell will deliver a lecture on the life and career of his former Senate colleague, Jim Bunning, on Friday at Northern Kentucky University. .

The lecture will take place at 4 p.m. Friday in the University Center Otto Budig Theater on the NKU campus.

Bunning, a former congressman and major league pitcher, will be there. It will be the fourth lecture in a series by McConnell on "Prominent Kentuckians in the U.S. Senate."

Bunning retired from the Senate in 2010; and was replaced by Sen. Rand Paul.

University of Virginia Center for Politics

    

Ohio has long been a political bell-weather state, and now Kentucky is in the spotlight, with pundits closely watching the race for Mitch McConnell’s senate seat, and the growing prominence of Kentucky’s junior senator, Tea Party favorite Rand Paul. Political Analyst and Creator of Sabato's Crystal Ball, Larry Sabato, discusses Kentucky’s role in national politics.

Continuing the conversation about Kentucky’s role on the national political stage from a local perspective, Political Analyst and Author Rick Robinson and Former Chair of the Kentucky Democratic Party, Nathan Smith, join Howard and Jay to discuss Mitch McConnell’s chances in 2014, and what part Rand Paul could play in the 2016 presidential election.

NPR

  US Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky now faces challenges to his 2014 re-election from both a Democrat and a Tea Party candidate. Political Junkie Ken Rudin joins us to discuss the effort to un-seat the long-serving Republican Senator, and talk about other races that will affect our region, and the country.

Would you like to hear the good news for Kentucky’s junior senator, Rand Paul, or the not-so-good news first?


Well, we don’t want to be accused of dwelling on the unpleasant, so we’ll start with the good news for Paul.


Paul, who rode the tea party wave to a seat in the U.S. Senate in 2010, is the front runner for the GOP presidential nomination in 2016, according to one recent poll.

Provided by campaign

Matt Bevin, a Louisville businessman with support from Kentucky tea party activists, plans to challenge Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell in the 2014 GOP Senate primary.

Bevin, a partner in a hedge fund group, plans to make his announcement at the Kentucky statehouse in Frankfort Wednesday morning; and go on to campaign stops in Newport and Louisville later in the day.

Challenging an incumbent U.S. Senator is always difficult; and McConnell already has $10 million in his campaign account and the support of a Super PAC called Kentuckians for strong leadership.

photo by Michael Keating

This week Howard Wilkinson talks about Council member Christopher Smitherman stepping down as NAACP President, and why Senator Mitch McConnell needs Rand Paul.

CORRECTION: Howard inadvertently said that Smitherman did not step down as NAACP president in the 2011 council election. He did step down.

photo by Michael Keating

WVXU political reporter Howard Wilkinson talks about why Cincinnati Council Candidate David Mann is asking the Cincinnati Democratic committee again for an endorsement.  He'll also talk about Mitch McConnell fighting for his Senate seat in Kentucky. 

If you are an incumbent elected official and you are facing re-election, with dismal looking poll numbers and a potentially difficult challenger looming on the horizon, there is one thing you are likely to do.


Knock that challenger down a notch or two before he or she even gets in the race.


This is the situation where Kentucky’s senior senator, Republican Mitch McConnell, the U.S. Senate minority leader, finds himself.

Official Portrait

Howard Wilkinson talks about Kentucky Senator Mitch McConnell's lack of popularity in his home state and what that could mean for his reelection bid.

Official Portrait

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell is going to have his hands full running for re-election in Kentucky next year, according to a poll released Tuesday.

And the same poll showed the junior senator from Kentucky, Rand Paul, is far more popular among Kentucky voters than McConnell, the leader of Senate Republicans.

Ashley Judd, actress and activist, after months of speculation and a lot of conversations with political consultants and pollsters, tweeted out her intentions this week.
 

She will not be a Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate in 2014. The Kentucky Democratic Party will have to find someone else to take on Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell.
 

So much for that. That political bubble burst pretty quickly.

Democratic party leaders in Kentucky did not appear to be shedding any tears.

Michael E. Keating

Ashley Judd, the actress and social activist, is planning on running for Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell's Senate seat in Kentucky, according to a Huffington Post story based on sources.

Michael E. Keating

Actress Ashley Judd, who has been talked about as a potential opponent in 2014 for Kentucky's Sen. Mitch McConnell, is the subject of a digital attack ad put on the internet by GOP strategist Karl Rove's Super PAC, American Crossroads GPS.

The ad mocks Judd, who studied at the University of Kentucky, for being a Tennessee resident and a "Hollywood liberal," who would follow President Obama lock-step if elected.

You can watch the ad here.

Four southwest Ohio, eastern Indiana and northern Kentucky U.S. House members voted "no" late Tuesday night on the bill to avert the nation falling over the "fiscal cliff."

Rep. Steve Chabot, R-Westwood; Rep. Jean Schmidt, R-Miami Township; Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Lewis County; and Rep. Mike Pence, R-Columbus, Ind. bucked the party leadership on the bill that would raise the income tax rate for individuals making over $450,000 a year and extended unemployment benefits for the long-term unemployed by one year.