Milton Dohoney

Staff

Cincinnati Council has officially accepted a plan that will let City Manager Milton Dohoney resign on December 1st and still receive a severance package.  

Mayor-elect John Cranley announced Wednesday night Dohoney would be leaving after conversations between the two of them.  

City Solicitor John Curp explained the item Council was being asked to approve.

“Provide for the manager to receive his separation pay subject to a resignation,” Curp said.  “It also appropriates money to the appropriate accounts to pay those benefits that he’s entitled too.”

Staff

Cincinnati City Manager Milton Dohoney Jr. will leave his job by Dec. 1, Mayor-elect John Cranley announced Wednesday night.

Cranley told reporters at a Wednesday night press conference he had met with Dohoney and that the decision for Dohoney, who was hired by out-going Mayor Mark Mallory in 2006, to leave was a mutual one.

"We just felt it was better to move in different directions,'' Cranley said at a downtown press conference.

Mayoral candidate John Cranley, along with several city council members and candidates, are calling on the Port Authority to put an end to the city's parking lease deal based on a memo from the city's parking lease consultant that says the costs will be excessive.

The June 20 memo, from Walker Parking Consultants, was delivered to the city administration the day before City Manager Milton Dohoney Jr. signed an agreement with the Port Authority to lease out the city's metered and garage parking to private companies.

Jay Hanselman

Cincinnati City Manager Milton Dohoney Thursday presented his proposed budget for the new fiscal year that begins on July 1st.   His plan included layoffs for 201 city employees, but that’s down from the 344 he first discussed last month.

Dohoney’s budget plan was given to Mayor Mark Mallory, who now has ten days to review it and make changes before sending it to City Council.

Michael Keating

Cincinnati's Mayor is sending the City Manager's recommended budget to Council for its consideration.  

Mark Mallory praised the administration's budget Tuesday and Milton Dohoney.

The mayor did make about a $1 million worth of changes to the proposed spending plan.  

Mallory wants to restore $610,770 of funding for human services programs, some or all of $300,000 for Media Bridges, $50,000 for arts grants and $56,000 for a domestic violence advocate in the city's law department.  

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