migraines

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There’s more to getting rid of headaches than just using painkillers; researchers at the University of Cincinnati confirmed there is a link between diet and migraines. Eliminating triggering processed foods high in nitrates, MSG, coffee and alcohol can ease migraines. Following a diet designed to prevent headaches, such as one low in carbohydrates, can also help.
 

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A new report from University of Cincinnati researchers is drawing a connection between asthma and migraines. Dr. Vincent Martin with the Division of Internal Medicine says migraine patients with asthma were two times more likely to develop chronic migraines.

Migraine sufferers who also deal with allergies and hay fever have more severe headaches than those who do not.

Those are the results of a study released Monday by the researches from three medical centers, including the University of Cincinnati.

Professor of Medicine Vincent Martin says, “We are not sure whether the rhinitis causes the increased frequency of headaches or whether the migraine attacks themselves produce symptoms of rhinitis in these patients. What we can say is if you have these symptoms, you are more likely to have more frequent and disabling headaches.”