Mark Mallory

CBS Television

CBS’ “Undercover Boss” premieres Dec. 20 with Union Township’s Nader Masadeh in disguise to check out his Buffalo Wings & Rings restaurants.

Masadeh, president and CEO, stars in the seventh season premiere on Dec. 20 (8:30 p.m., Channel 12, CBS). The Clermont County company has 66 restaurants. 

Yes, this is a politics column.

That’s why it says “Politically Speaking,” right there in red, white and blue.

But let’s face it – tomorrow is Opening Day in Cincinnati, the beginning of another season of baseball for the game’s oldest professional team; and a holiday for those of us who love the game.

Not a day in this part of the world where your thoughts turn immediately to the ins-and-outs of politics.

Unless, that is, you happen to be running for office.

City of Cincinnati

Former Cincinnati mayor Mark Mallory has taken a high-level job with a Pittsburgh-based engineering company.

Mallory, who left office Nov. 30 after eight years as Cincinnati’s mayor, will be the senior vice president and national director of community and North American economic development for the Chester Group.

The Chester Group provides “energy, water and wastewater solutions to public and industrial clients across the United States and internationally,” the company said in a press release.

Jay Hanselman

Workers at Cincinnati City Hall are getting ready for a new mayor and council to take office Sunday.

The Cincinnati Council session Tuesday was the last for Mayor Mark Mallory, City Manager Milton Dohoney and Council members Roxanne Qualls, Laure Quinlivan and Pam Thomas.  Much of the meeting was devoted to goodbyes for each.

Mallory could not seek re-election this year because of term limits.  He spoke about his time in office.

Mayor Mark Mallory

Nov 14, 2013
City of Cincinnati

  As Mayor Mark Mallory prepares to leave office, what will Cincinnatians remember most about his eight years leading the city, and where does he go from here? Howard Wilkinson talks with Mayor Mallory about his accomplishments, his legacy, his baseball pitching ability, and his possible future plans.

Michael Keating

WVXU political reporter, Howard Wilkinson talks about tomorrow's election and the last 24 hours of campaigning in the Cincinnati Mayor's race.

Say what you want about Mark Mallory’s eight years as mayor of Cincinnati, which are rapidly coming to a close.

You can love him; you can loathe him.

What you can’t do is ignore him.

The man is a showman. Part stand-up comic. Your genial host. The man of a thousand quips.

And, if you find yourself on the wrong side of an issue he supports, a bulldog, who fights and claws and cajoles until he gets what he wants. A mini-LBJ. A chip off the ol’ block – his father, William Mallory Sr., a leader in the Ohio House for decades, was the same way.

Jay Hanselman

Mayor Mark Mallory, quickly coming to the close of his eight years as Cincinnati mayor, used a combination of serious talk, comedic one-liners, videos and slide shows Tuesday night to make the case that he has helped turned a struggling city around.

Before a crowd of about 200 invited guests on a set dressed like a living room at Over-the-Rhine’s Ensemble Theatre, Mallory talked for an hour and five minutes about the legacy he leaves when he vacates the mayor’s office Dec. 1.

Some of Cincinnati's elected leaders are calling on national lawmakers to end the partial shutdown of the federal government. 

Mayor Mark Mallory said leaders need to end the conflict.  He said there are many examples of how the impasse is hurting the state's economy. 

Mallory said 7,500 people visit national parks in Ohio every day.

“So we’re in day 10 of this shutdown, 75,000 people have been turned away so far from national parks in the state of Ohio,” Mallory said.  “Resulting in a loss to our state economy of more than $2 million.”

Michael Keating

Cincinnati Council Members will have some extra time to campaign for re-election this fall.  The group voted Wednesday to cancel half of its scheduled meetings for the rest of the term which ends on December 1st.  

There will only be seven sessions in the next five months.  That compares to the 14 that would ordinarily be held.  

Council will meet as follows:  August 7th, September 11th, September 25th, October 9th, November 13th, November 20th and November 27th.

Member P.G. Sittenfeld was the only one voting “no” on the plan.

We learned something about Cincinnati City Council this week.

The mayor is not the absolute monarch inside city council chambers.

Except, that is, when he is.

Since December 2001, Cincinnati has had a directly-elected mayor who is not a voting member of council but chairs the meetings and controls the agenda. If a council member tries to raise an issue on the floor of council that the mayor doesn’t want to deal with, he or she can simply rule the council member out of order, proclaiming that it was a subject not on the council agenda and that was that.

Mayor Mark Mallory used some parliamentary wrangling at Wednesday's Cincinnati Council meeting to successfully knock down an attempt to repeal the city's controversial parking lease agreement.

Council member P.G. Sittenfeld, a Democrat, came into the council meeting believing he had five votes to scuttle the agreement, which city manager Milton Dohoney signed Monday.

Sarah Ramsey

Cincinnati Mayor Mark Mallory's budget plan released Wednesday reduces the number of police and fire department layoffs.  But 53 firefighters and 49 police officers would still be out of work in early June.  

Mallory said he believes the public safety layoffs are unavoidable.

Cincinnati Mayor Mark Mallory is rescinding raises he gave to several of his staff this week.

In a statement Mallory says:

“I am rescinding the raises that I gave my staff and returning all salaries to the previous levels.  Although the changes that I made in my office structure resulted in a saving of $66,000 to be used in next year’s budget, I realize that the perception has had a negative effect on the morale of other City Employees."

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati Mayor Mark Mallory's Youth Jobs Program will take place Thursday, March 28 at the Duke Energy Convention Center, but the mayor said Tuesday morning he needs more companies to get involved.

Mallory, in a press conference with city council member Yvette Simpson, said that many city departments will be offering summer jobs to young people from low-income families, but there are now about 40 non-profit and for-profit companies to set up booths at the job fair, which will run from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.

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