Lincoln Ware

John Kiesewetter

Everett Cork, who revived the R&B sound of old WCIN-AM with his Classic Vibes 1480CIN.com online radio station, died Sunday.

The Kennedy Heights resident was the keeper of the flame for WCIN-AM, the city's first station for African-Americans in 1953.

Radio One

Lincoln Ware, long-time radio talk voice of the African-American community, often said in 2016 that "when Obama leaves, I leave."

He's changed his mind.

Provided by Everett Cork

Former DJ Everett Cork and news reporter Gina Ruffin Moore talk about the good old days of WCIN-AM (1480), one of the nation’s first stations for African-Americans, at the main Public Library downtown Saturday afternoon.

“Hitting the airwaves in October 1953, WCIN-AM, the oldest Black radio station east of the Mississippi River, opened the door for other Black formatted stations to exist in the area,” says the publicity for the program from the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County.

Tribune Broadcasting

Before we welcome 2016, let’s look back at this year in TV, movies, radio and media from A to Z.

“The Buzz” is no more. After 15 years as the voice for African-Americans in Cincinnati, WDBZ-AM switched to gospel music late Thursday.

Owner Radio One has rebranded the station as “Praise 1230, Cincinnati’s Inspiration Station.”

Long-time talk host Lincoln Ware remains the only local talk host on the station.