landscaping

Lizzie Kibler

If you're a fan of Cincinnati Edition's monthly gardening show, here's a chance to hear from and meet our experts live and in person. 

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Now that it seems spring is finally here for good, it's time to see what kind of shape your yard and garden are in, plan what you would like to grow this year, and take steps now that will make caring for your plants, trees and lawns much easier this summer.

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There are many benefits to collecting your own seeds or trading seeds with other gardeners in your area, from preserving heirloom plants to finding new varieties to try.

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If you are a serious gardener, would like to dress-up your yard or make better use of the space you have available, winter is the perfect time to do some research, take some classes and put your landscape plans together so you're ready to start planting this spring.

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Typically gardeners in our region spend this time of year inside, researching new plants, ordering seeds and planning their spring gardens. 

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Even though the cold weather has settled in, that doesn't mean you have to stop gardening. 

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We are getting close to the time of year when many people consider turning over their gardens and allowing them to rest until spring. But there is still plenty of growing season left in our region. 

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Whether you are growing fruits and vegetables or prefer ornamental flowers in your landscaping, this is the time of year pests can invade and quickly damage or destroy your plants. 

Steve Cummings

Over the last several years, an increasing interest in learning more about where our foods come from and a desire to eat healthier have prompted more people living in urban areas to grow their own fruits and vegetables.

WVXU, Pete Rightmire

Flowers are in bloom, lawns are turning a deep green and spring is in the air. But there is still a chance we could experience hard frosts and even snow before the warm weather finally settles in.

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With the recent arctic air and snow, spring seems a long way off, but now is the time to start planning your garden and deciding how to get the best use of your landscape this year.

WVXU, Elizabeth Kibler

We're already experiencing some of the intense heat and extended dry spells we usually associate with late July and early August, broken-up by heavy downpours that can temporarily swamp container gardens and flower beds. Gardening in our climate can be a challenge, the trick is choosing the proper plants and knowing what they need to stay healthy and to grow.

 We all know the environmental importance of trees. And most homeowners realize they have a significant intrinsic worth as well. The right tree in the proper setting can define a landscape and add significantly to a home’'s resale value. This is the perfect time of year to plant or relocate trees, but picking, positioning and planting a tree takes some careful thought and planning.

  Temperatures in the 90's one week, then it gets unseasonably cool, then we go days without a drop of rain followed by heavy downpours, and then there are the molds, insects, deer, moles and other critters to contend with. Many people consider gardening and yard work relaxing and enjoyable, but maintaining gardens and landscapes around here takes time, effort and experience.

Monday was Earth Day, and one way to help preserve the landscape and soil is to maintain, and in some cases, resurrect, the native plants that once existed in all regions of the planet. A new book, Back to Eden: Landscaping with Native Plants provides information and instruction on starting a native plant garden, how to make a rain garden, dealing with pests and how to avoid using fertilizers. The author, Dr. Frank Porter, joins Mark Perzel on the phone to discuss the many benefits of using native plants.

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