Kroger

Jim Nolan/WVXU

Kentucky's secretary of state says no to President Trump's Election Commission, the Commonwealth's governor and attorney general continue their running feud and several new Kentucky laws recently go into effect. We'll discuss these and other recent developments in Kentucky politics. And we'll look at the latest Tri-state business news, including how Kroger is working to meet the challenges of a changing supermarket industry.

Lisa Andrews

Brightly painted, repurposed newspaper boxes are popping up all over Cincinnati. Inside you won't find papers but non-perishable items for anyone in need. Lisa Andrews started her first tiny food bank called the "People's Pantry Cincy" in Pleasant Ridge. With a grant from People's Liberty, Andrews is branching out to 10 local neighborhoods, including Walnut Hills. The recent closing of Kroger has created a food desert in that community.

City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati City Council will vote Wednesday on three ordinances needed to allow a plan to build a new Kroger store in Downtown to move forward.

The Budget and Finance Committee met Monday and approved the measures.

Jim Nolan/WVXU

President Trump was in Cincinnati Wednesday for a speech on rebuilding America's waterways. The Kroger Company announced plans to build a mixed-use project downtown, which will include the first grocery store the company has had downtown since 1969. And Cincinnati City Council looks at the city's budget and funding for the second year of the streetcar. 

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Update 2:50 p.m. Cincinnati-Dayton Division President Tim Brown says the store will be twice the size of the Vine Street grocery it's replacing.

"Following the success of our two-story Corryville store… the grocery store will be located on the first floor. On the second floor we'll have a bar housed alongside our beer and wine selection, as well as the food hall featuring several local food venders and restaurant style seating."

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Design LAB is a project-based K through 12 education program offered by the Architectural Foundation of Cincinnati and the Cincinnati Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA)

Provided / Jim LaBarbara

That vacant red brick building at Ninth & Elm Streets downtown bought by Kroger recently was once the studios for WLW-AM’s Jim LaBarbara, Rich King and James Francis Patrick O’Neill, and WLWT-TV’s Peter Grant, Gene Randall, Phil Samp and meteorologist Tony Sands.

For about 20 years, the COMEX building housed WLW’s radio operations and TV news across the street from WLW headquarters at Crosley Square, now the Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy-Armleder campus.

From the mid 1950s until 1976, people could sometimes watch WLW TV newscasts or radio shows through the huge plate glass windows and hear via outdoor speakers. Channel 5 viewers also saw announcer Bill Myers and DJ Jim “The Music Professor” LaBarbara do weather from the building’s roof.

Provided / Kroger

Kroger is buying out the Roundy's grocery chain for $3.60 per share, or about $178 million. Kroger values the total deal at $800 million. Roundy's operates primarily in Milwaukee, Madison and Northern Wisconsin under the Pick 'n Save, Copps and Metro Market banners. The deal also includes 34 Mariano's locations in the Chicago area.

Provided / Kroger

Kroger's plans to expand operations in Blue Ash have the go-ahead from the Ohio Tax Credit Authority. The board Monday morning approved a 65 percent, 10-year job creation tax credit.

  We learned yesterday that Kroger has acquired the majority of Cincinnati-based DunnhumbyUSA, the data analysis company that provides it with customer information. 

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

The relationship between the nation's largest supermarket chain and a market researcher is about to become tighter. 

Cincinnati based Kroger and dunnhumby Ltd. are replacing their current joint venture with a new agreement.  The grocery store company will also buy certain assets of dunnhumbyUSA, and operate under the name 84.51° with 500 current dunnhumbyUSA employees in Cincinnati. Those employees will become associates of 84.51°, a wholly-owned subsidiary of The Kroger Co.

Protesters take argument to Kroger shareholders

Oct 29, 2014
Bill Rinehart / WVXU

As Kroger shareholders met in Erlanger Wednesday morning, protesters gathered outside demanding a change to store policy. The nation's biggest supermarket company does not stop customers from coming into a store with a firearm, if state laws permit.  For one advocacy group that can be a problem. 

Provided / Kroger

Cincinnati-based Kroger has agreed to change the label on some of its chicken products.

The move is part of an agreement to dismiss a lawsuit in a federal court in California.

Under the settlement Kroger is agreeing to remove the phrase "raised in a humane environment" from the labeling on its Simple Truth chicken packaging.

The proposed class action case was filed in 2014 by an individual consumer who contended that the "raised in a humane environment" claim was misleading.

Cincinnati-based Kroger is taking over Harris Teeter Supermarkets in a transaction valued at about $2.5 billion. The merger means Kroger will buy all outstanding shares of Harris Teeter for $49.38 per share in cash.

Harris Teeter has 212 stores in the southeastern and mid-Atlantic markets and in Washington, D.C. Those stores will maintain the Harris Teeter brand name. The company posted revenues of approximately $4.5 billion for the 2012 fiscal year.

In a release, Kroger Chairman and Chief Executive Officer David B. Dillion says: