Judge Tracie Hunter

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

After her court appearance Wednesday on a new charge of misuse of a credit card, suspended juvenile court judge Tracie Hunter and her supporters went to the Hamilton County Commissioners meeting to ask that the board pull funding of her criminal trial.

But it is not clear if county commissioners have the authority to stop funding of criminal prosecution.

Hamilton County's budget office reports the county has spent roughly $460,000 prosecuting suspended juvenile court judge Tracie Hunter.

When including what the county spent in other Hunter-related court cases, the county says it spent more than $1.4 million in 2013 and 2014.

The Reverend Damon Lynch III and others Wednesday asked Commissioners to halt Hunter's retrial. The commissioners pay the bills, but have no say in whether or not the prosecution goes forward.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Hamilton County Judge Norbert Nadel has decided Judge Tracie Hunter will not be able to remain free during the appeal of her conviction of having an unlawful interest in a public contract.

Tuesday morning, Nadel ruled that Hunter must start serving her six month jail sentence December 29.

Hamilton County Judge Norbert Nadel acknowledging during sentencing that Tracie Hunter committed a low-level felony and was a first time offender, but said he couldn't get past the "dilemma of a double whammy," and that's why he sentenced her to six months in jail and six months probation.

When explaining the double whammy he said, "Judge Hunter is a judge and a public official and unfortunately it maybe a felony 4 but it's a double whammy."

After hearing the verdict one Hunter supporter cursed Judge Nadel and was thrown out of the courtroom.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

A suspended juvenile court judge will not get a new trial or an acquittal on her conviction for unlawful interest in a public contract.  Tracie Hunter was found guilty last month of using her position as a judge to preserve her brother's job as a bailiff. 

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