John Kasich

  It’s really hard to deny now that, believe it or not, Donald Trump may be unstoppable in his march to the Republican presidential nomination.

Ohio’s governor, John Kasich, one of the five GOP contenders still standing, doesn’t think so, but it is really very hard to see the narrow path Kasich will have to trod to supplant Trump when the Republicans meet in Cleveland in July for their presidential nominating convention.

Former Democratic governor Ted Strickland and Republican incumbent Rob Portman are in a virtual tie for Ohio's U.S. Senate seat, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday.

The same poll shows that Ohio Gov. John Kasich, if he becomes the Republican presidential nominee, would easily defeat either former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton or Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders in Ohio, a crucial swing state in this fall’s presidential election.

  John Kasich - who was re-elected as Ohio's governor  in 2014 with 64 percent of the vote - is trailing Republican front-runner Donald Trump by five percentage points among likely Ohio GOP primary voters, according to a poll released Tuesday morning by Quinnipiac University. 

The Quinnipiac Poll had Trump with 31 percent support among Ohio Republicans, compared to 26 percent for Kasich. 

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with news director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about Ohio Gov. John Kasich's fifth place finish in South Carolina. Kasich is staying in the race, but he must start winning state primaries, Wilkinson said.

Well, no need for John Kasich to pack his bags, come home and go back to his day job as Ohio’s governor.

He had a very respectable second-place finish in New Hampshire last Tuesday, even though his 16 percent of the vote was less than half of that of the 600-pound gorilla in the room, Donald Trump.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Wednesday morning about Ohio Gov. John Kasich's second-place finish in Tuesday's New Hampshire primary and if he can build on that to eventually win the GOP presidential nomination. 

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday about Monday night's Iowa presidential caucuses. Who might come away as winners? And does it really matter in the quest for the White House? 

There was a time, not so long ago, when the nation’s Amalgamated Union of American Political Pundits (OK, there’s no such organization, but you know what we mean) had Ohio’s junior senator, Rob Portman, on its list of potential Republican presidential contenders.

But Portman, the Terrace Park Republican, took himself out of the running early on and committed to running for re-election to a second term in the U.S. Senate, where he has, in a few short years, become a significant voice for the GOP and a close ally of Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the challenges Ohio Gov. John Kasich faces over the next month in his quest for the Republican presidential nomination. 

  Stop the presses! Rip up the front page! News flash!

The Ohio Republican Party’s central committee endorsed Ohio Gov. John Kasich in the March 15 GOP presidential primary Friday on a 44-9 vote.

What? You are not stunned by this news?

That’s OK. No one else was either.

Some Republicans around the state were grumbling about it, believing that the state party has no business butting into a presidential primary campaign.

U.S. Senate/U.S. State Department

Ohio Democrats will gather in all 16 of the state’s congressional districts Tuesday night to select delegate and alternate slates for Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders in Ohio’s March 15 primary election.

Ohio Republicans don’t use the caucus system to select delegates at the congressional district level – the campaigns of all 11 GOP candidates who have qualified for the March primary ballot have already been named by their campaigns and filed with the Ohio Secretary of State’s office.

  WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about what kind of field of candidates Ohio voters may face when they go to the polls March 15 for the Ohio presidential primary. 

 There are no less than 13 candidates for the Republican presidential nomination who would like to see a big hole poked in the balloon of front-runner Donald Trump and see him shrivel up and go away.

But there seems to be only one of them doing anything about it – the only one willing to bell the cat.

And that one is Ohio’s governor, John Kasich.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked this morning with news director Maryanne Zeleznik about Hamilton County Commissioner Greg Hartmann's surprising decision to withdraw from his re-election campaign; and the challenges faced by Ohio Gov. John Kasich in his presidential bid. 

  To say this 2016 presidential campaign has been unusual so far is belaboring the obvious. So we apologize for that.

But it has been very, very unusual.

“The campaign is unlike anything I have ever seen,’’ said Mack Mariani, associate professor and chair of the political science department at Xavier University. “If you had made this a movie, it would not have been believable.”

Let us take, for example, Ohio’s own entry into the Republican presidential scrum, Gov. John Kasich.

Pages