John Kasich

  SHARONVILLE - In his nearly eight months of campaigning for the GOP presidential nomination, Ohio Gov. John Kasich has been, as he described it to hundreds of friendly suburban Republicans here Saturday morning, “unrelentingly positive.”

He has not engaged in the name-calling and yelling that has marked most of the televised GOP candidate debates. But he has also never called out his chief rival in Tuesday’s critical Ohio primary, billionaire Donald J. Trump, for the angry tone he has set for his campaign or the violence that often erupts at his campaign events.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich and Donald J. Trump, locked in a critical battle for Ohio’s 66 Republican delegates in Tuesday’s primary election, will crisscross the state this weekend, including stops for both in Cincinnati.

Thursday morning, Linda Caudill, the Hamilton County chair of Trump’s campaign, said the campaign signed a contract “late last night” with the Duke Energy Convention Center to hold a Sunday rally.

She said she had no details on the rally but said they are expected to be released by the Trump campaign later today. This story will be updated.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about Saturday's Kentucky GOP presidential caucus, which gave Donald Trump a modest victory and gave a major headache to voters stuck in traffic and long lines at the polling places. 

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about tomorrow's Super Tuesday primaries and whether or not Ohio Gov. John Kasich has any chance of making progress in his long-shot bid for the Republican presidential nomination. 

  It’s really hard to deny now that, believe it or not, Donald Trump may be unstoppable in his march to the Republican presidential nomination.

Ohio’s governor, John Kasich, one of the five GOP contenders still standing, doesn’t think so, but it is really very hard to see the narrow path Kasich will have to trod to supplant Trump when the Republicans meet in Cleveland in July for their presidential nominating convention.

Former Democratic governor Ted Strickland and Republican incumbent Rob Portman are in a virtual tie for Ohio's U.S. Senate seat, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday.

The same poll shows that Ohio Gov. John Kasich, if he becomes the Republican presidential nominee, would easily defeat either former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton or Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders in Ohio, a crucial swing state in this fall’s presidential election.

  John Kasich - who was re-elected as Ohio's governor  in 2014 with 64 percent of the vote - is trailing Republican front-runner Donald Trump by five percentage points among likely Ohio GOP primary voters, according to a poll released Tuesday morning by Quinnipiac University. 

The Quinnipiac Poll had Trump with 31 percent support among Ohio Republicans, compared to 26 percent for Kasich. 

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with news director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about Ohio Gov. John Kasich's fifth place finish in South Carolina. Kasich is staying in the race, but he must start winning state primaries, Wilkinson said.

Well, no need for John Kasich to pack his bags, come home and go back to his day job as Ohio’s governor.

He had a very respectable second-place finish in New Hampshire last Tuesday, even though his 16 percent of the vote was less than half of that of the 600-pound gorilla in the room, Donald Trump.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Wednesday morning about Ohio Gov. John Kasich's second-place finish in Tuesday's New Hampshire primary and if he can build on that to eventually win the GOP presidential nomination. 

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