John Cranley

Update 12/18/13 @ 9:30 PM: 

Cincinnati Council will likely vote Thursday on whether the city's controversial streetcar project will continue. 

Construction has been on hold since December 4th.  Now the group will decide whether to let work resume or finally pull the plug on the plan. 

So far the city has spent $34 million on the streetcar project.  An independent audit firm reported Wednesday it will cost anywhere from $16 to $46 million to cancel the streetcar or about $69 million to complete it. 

Provided from City of Cincinnati

Federal transit officials Friday morning refused Mayor John Cranley's request to extend the Dec. 19 deadline for pulling $45 million in federal money from the streetcar project.

But the mayor's spokesman, Jay Kincaid, says Federal Transit Administrator Peter Rogoff did agree to talk to pro-streetcar advocates to allow them to make a pitch for more time.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley, who campaigned and won on a promise to kill the $133 million streetcar project, cracked open to the door to a deal with streetcar supporters that could allow the project to go forward.

In a city hall press conference this morning, Cranley said he would work with streetcar supporters to find institutions or foundations in the private sector to pay the approximately $80 million it would take to maintain and operate the system.

It is not something the city can do without private help, Cranley said.

Cincinnati Parks Director Willie Carden has informed Mayor John Cranley he's withdrawing from consideration to be the next city manager, according to a statement from the Mayor's spokesman.

Jay Hanselman

Cincinnati Council will not vote Wednesday to confirm Willie Carden as the next city manager.

Mayor John Cranley announced the delay Tuesday just before Council's Rules Committee was scheduled to interview Carden and take a vote.

Cranley said he was delaying the vote because he did not realize some council members had not seen an ordinance that will exempt Carden from living in the city.

"To make sure that Council has time to digest the ordinances," Cranley said. "And that all of you have the opportunity to meet with Mr. Carden individually before taking a vote."

Jay Hanselman

Sunday was a day of celebration and promises of cooperation, as the new mayor, Democrat John Cranley, and nine city council members were sworn into office in dual ceremonies at City Hall and the National Underground Freedom Center.

Monday, the celebrating will be over and the spirit of cooperation that hung over Sunday’s event will be put to the test; as the new council confronts its most contentious issue – Cranley’s desire to stop the $133 million streetcar project.

It’s a truism in politics: Running for office is the relatively easy part; the governing part is where it gets a little tricky.

John Cranley, the Democrat and former councilman who is sworn into office as Cincinnati’s 69th mayor today, has been around long enough to know this.

He came out of the November 5 election with a big win – 16 percentage points over rival and fellow Democrat Roxanne Qualls.

And he came out like a ball of fire.

Scuttle the parking lease deal?

No problem.

Cincinnati  Mayor-elect John Cranley Friday released his list of city council committees and who will be the chairpersons of those committees.  The full Council could approve them Sunday. 

The new streetcar committee is scheduled to meet Monday at noon.  A press release said the group will "consider a proposal aimed at pausing streetcar spending and implementing a comprehensive, objective review of the project in order to determine the true cost of cancellation vs. continuation."

Jay Hanselman

UPDATE: 11/27, 3 p.m.

At a crowded press conference inside Krohn Conservatory Wednesday afternoon, Mayor-elect John Cranley named his new city manager - parks director Willie Carden, a long-time city employee.

Carden's appointment is likely to be confirmed by the new city council on Wednesday.

"I wanted somebody I knew would be an operations guy,'' Cranley told the crowd of business leaders, politicians, and park board employees. "I think most of us believe that the parks department is one of the best run operations in the city."

Mann & Mann law firm

Newly-elected Cincinnati council member David Mann has held the mayor's office before, and now he will serve as new mayor John Cranley's vice mayor.

Cranley announced Mann as his vice mayor Monday afternoon in a press conference at Mann's downtown law office.

Mann served on council from 1974 to 1991, and had three years as mayor at a time when the mayor's office was mostly a ceremonial position.

Both Cranley and Mann are Democrats. Cranley said Mann is someone he can work well with.