Joe Schiavoni

State Sen. Joe Schiavoni says he’ll introduce legislation to legalize sports betting in Ohio, just days after the major party gubernatorial candidates discussed the idea.

The Democratic and Republican candidates for governor have filed their final fundraising reports before the May primary. And there’s a clear winner in the money race.

This weekend brought huge protests over gun laws and another appearance by Gov. John Kasich on a Sunday morning national TV news show, talking about his recent and public change of heart on gun laws. But it’s still unclear whether recently discussed gun law changes will move forward with state lawmakers.

red flag bill ohio
Jo Ingles / Ohio Statehouse News Bureau

 

A so-called "red flag" bill introduced in the Republican-dominated Ohio Senate would allow guns to be confiscated from people thought to be safety risks to themselves and others. Within two weeks of that seizure, a court would have to decide whether the person could get his or her gun back. 

WLWT-TV news anchor Sheree Paolello will moderate a debate by Democratic governor candidates broadcast live by the station at 7 p.m. April 10.

We hope you are sitting down while reading this, because this is astounding news:

Republicans running for governor in Ohio have more money than Democrats running for governor. Way more.

It's too early to tell if this is an advantage or a disadvantage, but it is a fact:

The field of Republican candidates for the 2018 Ohio gubernatorial election are generally better known than their Democratic counterparts.

About a month ago, David Pepper, the Ohio Democratic Party chairman, was more than a bit concerned.

Back then, he had no announced candidates for Ohio governor in 2018, while some rather well-known and well-funded Republicans were gearing up for a fight.

"The time to start organizing campaigns is now,'' Pepper told WVXU in February. "There is no time for exploratory committees and thinking about it. It is time to get on with it."

Well, ask and ye shall receive.

This election year was a relatively slow year for the Ohio legislature as lawmakers spent most of the year campaigning.  That changed in the last few weeks.

Several bills zipped through the lame duck session, but none in a more dramatic fashion than the last minute agreement on a way to change the process of drawing lawmakers’ district boundaries.

There were rumors of the resolution’s success and demise for days.  And after 17 hours of negotiations on the last day the Senate met, at 4 a.m. a vote was taken and it passed with only one "no" vote.