Jason Heikenfeld

Dottie Stover, University of Cincinnati

The first step in developing a Tricorder device may only be a few years away. UC researcher Jason Heikenfeld is testing his band-aid like patch. With just a few drops of sweat, it will monitor health and diagnose disease on people and in the lab using artificial skin that mimics sweat. Ann Thompson reports in "Focus on Technology."

Dottie Stover, University of Cincinnati

University of Cincinnati researchers are developing a Star Trek-like tricorder device to help you monitor your own health.

The tricorder, known for its ability in part to diagnose disease, isn't so futuristic anymore.

Diamond Select Toys simulates the sound of the Star Trek device. "Captain, we're picking up very light tricorder readings."

Dottie Stover, University of Cincinnati

The first step in developing a Tricorder device may only be a few years away. UC researcher Jason Heikenfeld is testing his band-aid like patch. With just a few drops of sweat, it will monitor health and diagnose disease on people and in the lab using artificial skin that mimics sweat. Ann Thompson reports in "Focus on Technology."