Issue 3

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Wednesday morning about Tuesday's election results in the Tristate - including the massive defeat if Issue 3, which would have legalized marijuana in Ohio; Issue 22; the Cincinnati Parks levy rejected soundly by city voters, and Matt Bevin's somewhat surprising win over Jack Conway in the Kentucky governor's race. 

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Yesterday the voters had their say, rejecting legalized marijuana in Ohio and the park levy in Cincinnati, and electing a Republican as governor of Kentucky.  Join us for a look at Tuesday’s election results.

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Ohio voters Tuesday soundly rejected a state constitutional amendment that would have legalized marijuana in Ohio and opened the door to a multi-million dollar industry growing and selling the plant.

With 97 percent of the state’s precincts reporting, 64 percent of Ohio voters were saying no to the plan, while 36 percent were saying they supported it.

WVXU-FM

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday about Tuesday's general election in the Tristate and the special election to be held next June to replace former House Speaker John Boehner in Ohio's 8th Congressional District. 

If you are going to your polling place Tuesday – or if you have voted already – you are likely in the minority among your friends, your co-workers, and your neighbors.

Most of them will not vote in Tuesday’s election – either in Kentucky, where they are choosing a new governor; or in Ohio, where voters are being asked to approve not only the legalization of marijuana but the creation of a large and likely very profitable industry to grow, process and sell it.

New governor? Legalizing marijuana? Sounds to us like the kind of things that should bring voters out in droves.

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Recent polls suggest that a majority of Ohioans back the legalization of marijuana.

But the question for Ohio voters on Nov. 3 is not whether they think marijuana should be legal. It is whether  they think Issue 3, a state constitutional amendment that would set up a large and profitable pot-producing industry owned by a handful of individuals, is the right way to do it.

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This November, Ohioans will vote on Ballot Issue 3 which, if passed, will legalize marijuana in the state. The path to legalization in Ohio has been winding and considerably difficult to follow, with even pro-legalization groups coming out against the specific proposal on the ballot, which limits marijuana cultivation to just ten farms, the number of sometimes surprising supporters of legalization, and many unanswered questions over the impact legalized pot will have on Ohio and surrounding states.