Howard Wilkinson

Here’s something we never expected to say a year ago, after Louisville businessman Matt Bevin - then the ultimate political party outsider - lost a tea party-fueled challenge to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in Kentucky’s GOP Senate primary:

Matt Bevin is now the Kentucky Republican Party’s candidate for governor in the November election.

The re-canvass Thursday of last week's votes in Kentucky's Republican gubernatorial race didn't change a thing.

Louisville businessman Matt Bevin still led Kentucky agriculture commissioner James Comer by 83 votes out of more than 214,000 cast.

As we head into summer, things are starting to heat up, and we'’re not just talking about the weather. The number of Republicans vying for their party’'s presidential nomination is growing each month, while many Democrats are hoping there are other candidates willing to step-up and challenge Hillary Clinton.

No objections to close elections here. 

As a politics reporter, they’re much more fun to cover than blow-outs.

And did we ever have a close one Tuesday night in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, on the Republican side of the Kentucky gubernatorial primary.

WVXU politics reporters Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about tomorrow's GOP gubernatorial primary in Kentucky, which appears to be too close to call.

The leadership of the Democratic Party, both here in Ohio and in Washington, really doesn’t know what to make of Cincinnati council member P.G. Sittenfeld.

Is this guy just dense?, they must be thinking. Doesn’t he get the picture?

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about Kentucky's Rand Paul and Ohio's John Kasich - specifically, what the polling in the early caucus and primary states of Iowa and New Hampshire have to say about them.

Can the Republicans win the White House without winning Ohio next year?

Conventional wisdom (not to mention history, which is a better guide) says, no, they can’t. No Republican president – and we’re going back to the very first, Abraham Lincoln – has ever won the White House without winning Ohio.

In fact, the way the electoral college map skews toward Democratic presidential candidates, most political analysts see the Republican nominee coming up short of the 270 electoral votes needed to win without taking both Ohio and Florida.

There are plenty of local tax levies and bond issues to be decided in southwest Ohio in Tuesday's primary election, but contested candidate races are few and far between.

Hamilton County’s polling places could soon replace paper poll books with electronic ones – possibly by November’s election.

The Hamilton County Board of Elections unanimously voted Monday morning to authorize its staff to prepare a contract with Tenax, a Florida company, to place the electronic poll books in all 373 of the county’s polling places.