Howard Wilkinson

Michael E. Keating/WVXU

Each Friday on Cincinnati Edition, we present an in-depth look at the developments behind the headlines.

Department of State

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton was to have held a fundraising event late Monday afternoon at the home of Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley, but it has been postponed, according to sources close to the mayor. 

There can be no denying the historic nature of the moment in late July when Hillary Clinton steps to the podium at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia to become the first woman nominated by a major party as its presidential candidate.

"I'm grateful that it is happening in my lifetime,'' said Kathy Helmbock, a Clinton supporter and a long-time activist in feminist organizations such as the National Organization for Women and the Cincinnati Women's Political Caucus.

Department of State

Update 06/09/16:   A source said Thursday there will be no public event, because of time restraints on the candidate. 

Hillary Clinton, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, will be in Cincinnati Monday for a private fundraising event. 

Businessman and former soldier Warren Davidson, a Miami County Republican, has vaulted from political obscurity  last year to a seat in the U.S. House this year. 

With all 100 percent of the 8th Congressional District's 558 precincts reporting, Davidson held a massive lead over his two opponents, showing how strong a Republican district the 8th really is. 

Davidson, from Troy in Miami County, had 77 percent to 21 percent for Democrat Corey Foister of West Chester. A third candidate, James J. Condit Jr., who has been disavowed by the Green Party had two percent support.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about Tuesday's special general election in Ohio's 8th Congressional District. Only one race is on the ballot - a contest among three candidates to fill out the remainder of the term of John Boehner, the former House Speaker who resigned from Congress last fall. The winner of Tuesday's election will have a leg up on the November election, when 8th District choose a House member for a full two-year term. 

Donald Trump and (presumably) Hillary Clinton will be the featured bout in this November's election in the key swing state of Ohio, the bellwether of presidential elections for as long as anyone can remember.

But the undercard fight in Ohio is a pretty good one too.

The first of two elections this year to fill the vacant seat of former House Speaker John Boehner in Ohio's 8th Congressional District takes places Tuesday.

It is a special election to fill out the unexpired term of Boehner, the West Chester Republican, who not only resigned the speakership but resigned from the House last fall. He was, in essence, pushed out by a rebellious Republican House caucus that believed Boehner was too willing to compromise with the Democrat in the White House

Ohio's amazing "Golden Week" – the week before the deadline for voter registration where Ohioans can register to vote and cast their ballots at the same time.

Amazing, because it seems to keep materializing and de-materializing.

Abracadabra! Hocus pocus! Now you see it; now you don't.

Pete Rightmire/WVXU

    

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton won Washington State's primaries Tuesday. It looks all but certain the two will face-off in November. But Bernie Sanders has vowed to stay in the race until the convention.

Our Friday News Review

May 20, 2016
Michael Keating / WVXU

Each Friday on Cincinnati Edition we present an in-depth look at the developments behind the headlines. Joining us this week to discuss the people, stories and events affecting the Tri-state are investigative reporter for The Cincinnati Enquirer James Pilcher; WCPO.com/WCPO Insider Managing Editor, Opinion and Engagement, David Holthaus; from WCPN Ideastream in Cleveland, reporter and producer Nick Castele; and WVXU political reporter Howard Wilkinson.

  A veteran state legislator and the incumbent moved on in Tuesday's Covington mayoral primary to face each other in November.

Joe Meyer, a former state representative and senator who worked in former Gov. Steve Beshear's cabinet, came in first with 47 percent of the vote in a field of four candidates for mayor, according to the Kenton County Clerk's office.

Sherry Carran, who was first elected to the city commission in 2007 and became the city's first female  mayor in 2013, finished second with 40 percent of the vote.

Newport voters will go to the polls Tuesday and find a race that really isn't a race. And if they cast a ballot in that race, it won't be counted.

It's the city commission race; and Campbell County Clerk Jim Luersen said there is a good reason for not counting the votes.

Incumbent commissioner John Hayden decided in January that he would not run for re-election, but did not file paperwork with the clerk's office in time to have his name removed from the ballot, Luersen said.

It's entirely possible – even likely – that many people, including the subset of humanity known as "political pundits," can take polling done six months before a presidential election way too seriously.

Not to denigrate the pollsters. The Quinnipiac University Polling Institute, the academic polling operation that released two "key state" polls on the presidential election and Senate elections in Ohio, Florida and Pennsylvania last week is well-respected and professional.

One thing is certain - Covington residents will elect at least two new city commissioners this year. 

Incumbents Steve Frank and Chuck Eilerman are not running for re-election.

That has drawn a crowd of 10 Covington commission candidates who will be on the ballot in Tuesday's Kentucky primary.

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