Homelessness

Preliminary information shows the number of homeless people in Cincinnati and Hamilton County declined slightly during a point-in-time count last month.  

The Department of Housing and Urban Development requires communities to make the count once a year during the last week of January.  

Kevin Finn with Strategies to End Homelessness said this year there 1,029 people counted compared to 1,043 last year.

Panhandlers are an all-too-common sight in most large cities, including Cincinnati, and even though non-aggressive panhandling is legal here, it can be bothersome to visitors, residents and workers. And giving a panhandler money is not the best way to truly help the suffering. Downtown Cincinnati Incorporated recently launched a program to make people more aware of local agencies and services, such as the Winter Shelter, and how they better serve those in need. Joining us to talk about the Panhandling Education Program and helping the homeless in Cincinnati are Cincinnati Police Captain Mike Neville, David Ginsburg, president and CEO of Downtown Cincinnati Inc., and Kevin Finn, president and CEO of Strategies to End Homelessness.

Homeless census starts tonight

Jan 27, 2015

**UPDATE 1-29-15** Strategies to End Homelessness has secured $15.3 million dollars from a HUD grant.  

A press release from the group on Wednesday says Hamilton County and Cincinnati are sharing in $1.8 billion in grants to be distributed nationwide,  announced in the last week.  

Downtown Cincinnati Inc. is launching an effort to decrease panhandling while maintaining or increasing support to social services.  DCI president David Ginsburg says the group is publicizing agencies that try to get to the root of poverty.

Cincinnati Council could soon be asked to add homeless status or perceived homeless status to the city's hate crimes law.

Council Member Chris Seelbach and others are making the announcement Thursday during a press conference near the Drop Inn Center in Over-the-Rhine.

"Which means that if police determine that the crime was committed because the person was homeless or perceived to be homeless, then a judge could add up to 180 days on the sentence of the person who committed the crime," Seelbach said.

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