Jacob Dolson Cox was a divinity student, Ohio governor, University of Cincinnati president, attorney, a contemporary of James A. Garfield and James Monroe, military historian, and a battlefield commander in the Union Army, rising to the rank of major general. A new biography of prominent Ohioan Jacob Dolson Cox by Eugene Schmiel reveals for the first time Cox’s remarkable Civil War service. Dr. Schmiel joins us to discuss his new book, Citizen-General: Jacob Dolson Cox and the Civil War Era.

  THE BOYS IN THE BOAT: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics, by Daniel James Brown, tells the story of the University of Washington’s 1936 eight-oar crew and their epic quest for an Olympic gold medal, a team that transformed the sport and grabbed the attention of millions of Americans. Daniel James Brown joined us to talk about the improbable story of nine working-class boys from the American west who beat the odds and found hope in the most desperate of times.

Provided, Ohio chapter of the Society of Colonial War


Provided, Chicago Review Press

In September, 1955 Emma Gatewood became the first woman to hike the entire Appalachian Trail alone, as well as the first person, man or woman, to walk it twice, and three times. Grandma Gatewood, as reporters called her, started her first hike along the trail after telling her family she was going out for a walk. The next anybody heard from her she had hiked the first 800 miles of the 2,050-mile trail. Ben Montgomery, enterprise reporter for the Tampa Bay Times and founder of the narrative journalism website Gangrey.com, scoured Emma Gatewood’s diaries, trail journals and correspondence, and interviewed surviving family members and people she met along her hike, to unveil the story behind this 67-year old grandmother and her journeys. He talks with us about his book, Grandma Gatewood's Walk: The Inspiring Story of the Woman Who Saved the Appalachian Trail.

Author Dane Huckelbridge has taken a “shot” at writing the definitive history of the beverage once distilled by George Washington and enjoyed by soldiers on both sides of the Civil War. Bourbon: A History of the American Spirit takes readers through centuries of distilling, imbibing, fighting, mixing, and outlawing. The author stopped by our studio to talk all things bourbon with our Mark Heyne.

Provided, Harper Collins


Many Americans tend to think of the Civil War as more glorious and less awful than its reality. In Living Hell: The Dark Side of the Civil War, Northern Kentucky University Regents Professor of History Emeritus Dr. Michael C. C. Adams gathers the voices of those who were on the firing line or in the hospital ward to create a far more realistic, and brutal, picture of the war. Dr. Adams is presenting a lecture on his work at 3 PM, April 10, in the Griffin Hall George and Ellen Rieveschl Digitorium on the NKU campus. For more information, call the NKU Department of History and Geography at (859) 572-5461.

Provided, hatecrimesheartland.com

  Hate Crimes in the Heartland, a new documentary that explores the 250,000 hate crimes committed in the United States each year through the lens of two hate crimes in Tulsa, Oklahoma, premiers Monday night at the Freedom Center. Emmy Award-winning Film Maker Rachel Lyon discusses her latest documentary. To view a trailer of the film, click here.

Provided, Negro Leagues Baseball Museum

  In the first half of the 1900s racism and Jim Crow laws kept African-American baseball players from being on the same teams as white players. So in 1920 the Negro National League was formed, soon followed  by other rival Negro Leagues. An exhibit now on display at the Galleries at Sinclair in Dayton, Ohio, Shades of Greatness, is the first collaborative art exhibition inspired by the history of Negro Leagues Baseball.