history

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On January 23, the Holocaust & Humanity Center will present Violins of Hope, a community performance featuring nine Holocaust era violins, played by some of Cincinnati's finest musicians.

amazon.com

Imagine what it would be like to be the son or daughter of a dictator, someone most of the world considers a monster, such as Stalin or Pol Pot. What would you do, if you were the child of someone so infamous?

National Archives and Records Administration

 

Seventy-five years ago today, Japanese forces attacked the U.S. Naval Base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

The lesser-known connection between General Ulysses S. Grant and the Underground Railroad is explored in-depth in the book Ulysses Underground: the Unexplored Roots of U. S. Grant and the Underground Railroad

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President Theodore Roosevelt called them the most American thing in America. He was talking about the chautauqua tent assemblies that originated in the 19th century and quickly grew across rural America, bringing entertainment and culture to entire communities.

In his new book, The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl: How Two Brave Scientists Battled Typhus and Sabotaged the Nazis, Politico eHealth Editor Arthur Allen tells the true story of the battle against disease and genocidal ideology, told through the lives of microbiologists Rudolf Weigl and Ludwick Fleck, who fought typhus and cruelty from the Russian POW camps of WWI to the ghettos and concentration camps of Nazi-occupied Europe.

Richard O. Jones was a longtime writer for The Hamilton Journal-News, but he has now embarked on a new career as true crime historian.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

An archeological dig in eastern Clermont County is just about to end for this year.  But the dig is just the beginning of the story. 

Provided / Margaret McDiarmid and family

Along US 52, near New Richmond are the remnants of a school that played a role in American history.  Until now, that school had been largely forgotten.

But a professor at Northern Kentucky University is hoping to uncover details about the Parker Academy by unearthing its debris and bringing its story to light.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Rearranging historical artifacts is nothing new at the Cincinnati Museum Center.  Temporary exhibits come and go.  But rarely is the move a big production as it was Tuesday morning.

Three employees of a rigging company set up a trestle overhead as they prepared to move 3,500 pounds of iron in the form of a 150-year-old cannon.  They placed blankets around the barrel; and connected straps to a chain pulley system.  They were as careful as they could be.

Rowan & Litttlefield Publishers

This interview originally ran on December 18, 2013

Provided, Lisa Alther

NOTE: This interview originally aired March 7, 2014

  

Blood Feud: The Hatfields and the McCoys

 

Pompeii Revealed

Sep 22, 2014
Provided, University of Cincinnati

NOTE: This interview originally aired March 7, 2014.

  

Note: This interview originally aired March 18, 2014.

  Jacob Dolson Cox was a divinity student, Ohio governor, University of Cincinnati president, attorney, a contemporary of James A. Garfield and James Monroe, military historian, and a battlefield commander in the Union Army, rising to the rank of major general. A new biography of prominent Ohioan Jacob Dolson Cox by Eugene Schmiel reveals for the first time Cox’s remarkable Civil War service. Dr. Schmiel joins us to discuss his new book, Citizen-General: Jacob Dolson Cox and the Civil War Era.

  THE BOYS IN THE BOAT: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics, by Daniel James Brown, tells the story of the University of Washington’s 1936 eight-oar crew and their epic quest for an Olympic gold medal, a team that transformed the sport and grabbed the attention of millions of Americans. Daniel James Brown joined us to talk about the improbable story of nine working-class boys from the American west who beat the odds and found hope in the most desperate of times.

Provided, Ohio chapter of the Society of Colonial War

  

Provided, Chicago Review Press

In September, 1955 Emma Gatewood became the first woman to hike the entire Appalachian Trail alone, as well as the first person, man or woman, to walk it twice, and three times. Grandma Gatewood, as reporters called her, started her first hike along the trail after telling her family she was going out for a walk. The next anybody heard from her she had hiked the first 800 miles of the 2,050-mile trail. Ben Montgomery, enterprise reporter for the Tampa Bay Times and founder of the narrative journalism website Gangrey.com, scoured Emma Gatewood’s diaries, trail journals and correspondence, and interviewed surviving family members and people she met along her hike, to unveil the story behind this 67-year old grandmother and her journeys. He talks with us about his book, Grandma Gatewood's Walk: The Inspiring Story of the Woman Who Saved the Appalachian Trail.

Author Dane Huckelbridge has taken a “shot” at writing the definitive history of the beverage once distilled by George Washington and enjoyed by soldiers on both sides of the Civil War. Bourbon: A History of the American Spirit takes readers through centuries of distilling, imbibing, fighting, mixing, and outlawing. The author stopped by our studio to talk all things bourbon with our Mark Heyne.

Provided, Harper Collins


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Many Americans tend to think of the Civil War as more glorious and less awful than its reality. In Living Hell: The Dark Side of the Civil War, Northern Kentucky University Regents Professor of History Emeritus Dr. Michael C. C. Adams gathers the voices of those who were on the firing line or in the hospital ward to create a far more realistic, and brutal, picture of the war. Dr. Adams is presenting a lecture on his work at 3 PM, April 10, in the Griffin Hall George and Ellen Rieveschl Digitorium on the NKU campus. For more information, call the NKU Department of History and Geography at (859) 572-5461.

WVXU

Provided, hatecrimesheartland.com

  Hate Crimes in the Heartland, a new documentary that explores the 250,000 hate crimes committed in the United States each year through the lens of two hate crimes in Tulsa, Oklahoma, premiers Monday night at the Freedom Center. Emmy Award-winning Film Maker Rachel Lyon discusses her latest documentary. To view a trailer of the film, click here.

Provided, Negro Leagues Baseball Museum

  In the first half of the 1900s racism and Jim Crow laws kept African-American baseball players from being on the same teams as white players. So in 1920 the Negro National League was formed, soon followed  by other rival Negro Leagues. An exhibit now on display at the Galleries at Sinclair in Dayton, Ohio, Shades of Greatness, is the first collaborative art exhibition inspired by the history of Negro Leagues Baseball.

Provided, Harlow Giles Unger

Provided, elizabethpartridge.com

  Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning celebrates one of the twentieth century’s most important photographers, Dorothea Lange. The companion to a PBS American Masters episode that will air later this year, the book offers an intimate view into the life and work of one of our most cherished documentary photographers.

University of Minnesota Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies

  An estimated 11 million people were killed during the Holocaust. Six million of them were Jews. Of those, more than one million were children. The Center for Holocaust and Humanity Education, formed by a group of Holocaust survivors and their families, educates about the Holocaust, remembers its victims and acts on its lessons.

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  The Ohio River reached its highest point in recorded history, 79.99 feet, on January 26, 1937. Author and University of Central Arkansas Associate Professor David Welky wrote a definitive book on the tragedy, The Thousand Year Flood: The Ohio-Mississippi disaster of 1937.

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