heart surgery

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As crazy as it may sound to the non-scientist, cells in a patient's jaw may be able to rejuvenate their bad heart.

Yi-Gang Wang, MD, PhD, a professor in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and former heart surgeon, explains that when we are growing in the womb our facial muscle cells develop near the heart. They eventually migrate to the head and are similar to heart cells.

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People in Greater Cincinnati waiting for a heart transplant will no longer have to travel hundreds of miles.  After a nearly ten year hiatus, UC Health is again offering the surgery.  David Waits of Hillsboro received a new heart February 2nd.

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A Labrador Retriever puppy named Maggie is recovering at home after undergoing the first minimally invasive heart procedure of its kind ever preformed in the Tri-State.

The four-month-old was born with a Patent Ductus Arteriosis (PDA), a congenital heart defect.

Typically the defect is fixed through open-chest surgery but Drs. Megan McLane and Maggie Schuckman of the Care Center in Blue Ash used a minimally invasive intravascular technique that drastically reduces the animal's recovery.