health

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Earlier this month, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced it will regulate electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, the same way it regulates traditional tobacco products. Many smokers turn to e-cigarettes to stop smoking; despite some claims of effectiveness, there are still concerns, as the health risks of e-cigarettes are largely unknown.

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While going gluten-free may seem like a trend for some, it’s a necessary precaution for those with celiac disease or gluten intolerance. Gluten – found in wheat proteins, rye, barley and triticale – causes inflammation in the small intestines of those who suffer from the immune disorder or have gluten-sensitivity. Eating a gluten-free diet helps to control these symptoms and any associated discomfort.

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A new report from University of Cincinnati researchers is drawing a connection between asthma and migraines. Dr. Vincent Martin with the Division of Internal Medicine says migraine patients with asthma were two times more likely to develop chronic migraines.

Cincinnati-area churches will be offering free health screenings to men, women and children this Sunday at 18 locations.  

Health Day involves more than 40 community partners and more than 800 volunteers working to reduce preventable health disparities in the city's urban community.  

According to Cradle Cincinnati, babies born to women who smoke during pregnancy are 44% more likely to die before their first birthday. The local organization, created to help reduce our area’s infant mortality rate, has just launched a campaign to help pregnant women stop smoking. 

A new effort is underway in Cincinnati to address health disparities in urban neighborhoods.  First Lady Dena Cranley and about 20 pastors' wives are involved in the program.  

Cranley launched the First Ladies Health Initiative Friday during an event at City Hall.

“This initiative will leverage the leadership of the first ladies of the churches of Cincinnati to empower their congregation and community to make smart decisions about health and wellness,” Cranley said.   

 

  

 

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