health

Courtney Reimlinger was breastfeeding her week-old son last year when she felt a pain in her chest.

The pain was excruciating, the 23-year-old Indianapolis native remembers, much worse than the 10 hours in labor she'd spent a week before. It spread up her neck and into her head, and soon she was slipping in and out of consciousness.

Editor's note: Mike Quirk was originally misidentified in this story.

Mental-health care can be hard to access in much of Ohio, especially away from the larger cities. This installment of our series Navigating the Path to Mental Health looks at the challenges along the way to finding and getting mental-health services.

Provided / University of Cincinnati

A new treatment for a rare but aggressive brain cancer like the kind John McCain is fighting is showing positive results.

Michael Keating / WVXU

It has nothing to do with FC Cincinnati being granted a Major League Soccer franchise

Senior Suicides Rising In Ohio

May 31, 2018
senior suicides
Pixabay

The health and quality of care for seniors in Ohio is improving, according to a report by United Health Foundation. That includes the quality of senior dental visits, home healthcare, and nursing homes compared to last year.

But Ohio also saw a rise in senior suicides, according to Dr. Rhonda Randall, chief medical officer of UnitedHealthcare Retiree Solutions.

Why Kentucky's Tick Season May Be Worse Than Usual

May 30, 2018
tick
Wikimedia Commons

Though Kentucky doesn’t have as big of a problem with tick-borne diseases as some areas in the northeast, a tick expert is warning residents to be on the lookout as the summer kicks off.

Pixabay

A study by the United Health Foundation ranks Kentucky 48th in its annual report on senior citizens. That’s a slight improvement over the state’s ranking last year.

More than three-quarters of Americans older than 60 have some kind of hearing loss, but only a fraction use technology that would help them talk on the phone or understand a conversation at dinner.

Hearing aids are expensive, and they’re not covered by Medicare or many private insurance plans.

“I’m not sure people realize how expensive they are,” says Betty Hauck, 72, whose hearing aids cost $5,600.

poison control
Pixabay

More than two million poisonings are reported each year to the 55 poison control centers in the United States. More than 90 percent of these poisonings occur in the home. While poisonings affect all age groups, children younger than six years old make up 41 percent of poison exposures annually.

With the opioid crisis killing an estimated 11 Ohioans a day, state medical boards are rolling out additional rules for doctors and other prescribers who have patients dealing with long-term and acute pain. The guidelines create new hurdles to jump over before a doctor can prescribe opioid-based painkillers. 

To the untrained, the evidence looks promising for a new medical device to ease opioid withdrawal. A small study shows that people feel better when the device, an electronic nerve stimulator called the Bridge, is placed behind their ear.

The company that markets the Bridge is using the study results to promote its use to anyone who will listen: policymakers, criminal justice officials and health care providers.

The message is working.

A new bill has been introduced that would require health classes cover fetal development and offer students information on where they can find prenatal care. But it doesn’t include other related information.

A large increase in Hepatitis A cases in Ohio has health officials concerned. There have been 47 cases of the highly contagious liver infection confirmed this year compared to just five cases at this same time last year.

How To Save A Life

Apr 25, 2018
njsharingnetwork.org

April is National Donate Life Month. In 2016, more than 33,600 transplants brought renewed life to patients and their families. But another person is added to the nation's organ donor list every 10 minutes. And, on average, 22 people die each day while waiting for a transplant.

LinkedIn

After two years, Cincinnati is finally set to have a new health commissioner.

There is a paradox with living as a human nowadays.

A 2014 article from the United Nations states that about 54 percent of the human population lives in urban areas (more by now), a proportion that is projected to increase to 66 percent by 2050. By 2045, the report says, more than six billion people will crowd cities.

Ohio Doctors Can Now Apply For Medical Marijuana Certification

Mar 27, 2018

Ohio is one step closer to getting its medical marijuana program operating by September. The state medical board has opened the online application to certify doctors, who will be the first point of contact for patients who qualify for medical marijuana.

Cincinnati Children's

Sickle cell patients face a lifetime of getting blood transfusions because there's no cure for the disease. It's a fact of life for brother and sister Taryn Walker, 14, and King Walker, 11, both students at the School for the Creative and Performing Arts.

A health care association is touting what its members believe to be a clear path Ohioans can take to cut down on opioid addiction. This path would take a culture change when it comes to the reputation of alternative medicine.

Living Well

Oct 9, 2017
Provided

Founded in 2007, the Live Well Collaborative is an academic-industry innovation center that focuses on products, services and system solutions for living well across a lifespan, especially for those who are age 50 and up.

Pixabay.com

You started a diet as the calorie-rich holidays passed and the new year got underway. Things were going well.

Flickr, available for use

 
There’s more to getting rid of headaches than just using painkillers; researchers at the University of Cincinnati confirmed there is a link between diet and migraines. Eliminating triggering processed foods high in nitrates, MSG, coffee and alcohol can ease migraines. Following a diet designed to prevent headaches, such as one low in carbohydrates, can also help.
 

Wikimedia Commons, available for use

 

Last month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention revealed that the rates of the three most common sexually transmitted diseases, chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis, are at an all-time high. 

en.wikipedia.org, available for use

  

The 2016 Summer Olympic Games commenced in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil last Friday. The excitement for the games has been tempered by concerns over the Zika virus; with 166,000 suspected and confirmed cases of the mosquito-borne virus, the country is facing a Zika epidemic. 

http://vaping360.com/what-is-vaping/ / commons.wikimedia.org, available for use

Earlier this month, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced it will regulate electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, the same way it regulates traditional tobacco products. Many smokers turn to e-cigarettes to stop smoking; despite some claims of effectiveness, there are still concerns, as the health risks of e-cigarettes are largely unknown.

www.thebluediamondgallery.com, available for use

While going gluten-free may seem like a trend for some, it’s a necessary precaution for those with celiac disease or gluten intolerance. Gluten – found in wheat proteins, rye, barley and triticale – causes inflammation in the small intestines of those who suffer from the immune disorder or have gluten-sensitivity. Eating a gluten-free diet helps to control these symptoms and any associated discomfort.

Pixabay.com

A new report from University of Cincinnati researchers is drawing a connection between asthma and migraines. Dr. Vincent Martin with the Division of Internal Medicine says migraine patients with asthma were two times more likely to develop chronic migraines.

Cincinnati-area churches will be offering free health screenings to men, women and children this Sunday at 18 locations.  

Health Day involves more than 40 community partners and more than 800 volunteers working to reduce preventable health disparities in the city's urban community.  

According to Cradle Cincinnati, babies born to women who smoke during pregnancy are 44% more likely to die before their first birthday. The local organization, created to help reduce our area’s infant mortality rate, has just launched a campaign to help pregnant women stop smoking. 

A new effort is underway in Cincinnati to address health disparities in urban neighborhoods.  First Lady Dena Cranley and about 20 pastors' wives are involved in the program.  

Cranley launched the First Ladies Health Initiative Friday during an event at City Hall.

“This initiative will leverage the leadership of the first ladies of the churches of Cincinnati to empower their congregation and community to make smart decisions about health and wellness,” Cranley said.   

Pages