health

There is a paradox with living as a human nowadays.

A 2014 article from the United Nations states that about 54 percent of the human population lives in urban areas (more by now), a proportion that is projected to increase to 66 percent by 2050. By 2045, the report says, more than six billion people will crowd cities.

Ohio Doctors Can Now Apply For Medical Marijuana Certification

Mar 27, 2018

Ohio is one step closer to getting its medical marijuana program operating by September. The state medical board has opened the online application to certify doctors, who will be the first point of contact for patients who qualify for medical marijuana.

Cincinnati Children's

Sickle cell patients face a lifetime of getting blood transfusions because there's no cure for the disease. It's a fact of life for brother and sister Taryn Walker, 14, and King Walker, 11, both students at the School for the Creative and Performing Arts.

A health care association is touting what its members believe to be a clear path Ohioans can take to cut down on opioid addiction. This path would take a culture change when it comes to the reputation of alternative medicine.

Living Well

Oct 9, 2017
Provided

Founded in 2007, the Live Well Collaborative is an academic-industry innovation center that focuses on products, services and system solutions for living well across a lifespan, especially for those who are age 50 and up.

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You started a diet as the calorie-rich holidays passed and the new year got underway. Things were going well.

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There’s more to getting rid of headaches than just using painkillers; researchers at the University of Cincinnati confirmed there is a link between diet and migraines. Eliminating triggering processed foods high in nitrates, MSG, coffee and alcohol can ease migraines. Following a diet designed to prevent headaches, such as one low in carbohydrates, can also help.
 

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Last month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention revealed that the rates of the three most common sexually transmitted diseases, chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis, are at an all-time high. 

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The 2016 Summer Olympic Games commenced in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil last Friday. The excitement for the games has been tempered by concerns over the Zika virus; with 166,000 suspected and confirmed cases of the mosquito-borne virus, the country is facing a Zika epidemic. 

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Earlier this month, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced it will regulate electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, the same way it regulates traditional tobacco products. Many smokers turn to e-cigarettes to stop smoking; despite some claims of effectiveness, there are still concerns, as the health risks of e-cigarettes are largely unknown.

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While going gluten-free may seem like a trend for some, it’s a necessary precaution for those with celiac disease or gluten intolerance. Gluten – found in wheat proteins, rye, barley and triticale – causes inflammation in the small intestines of those who suffer from the immune disorder or have gluten-sensitivity. Eating a gluten-free diet helps to control these symptoms and any associated discomfort.

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A new report from University of Cincinnati researchers is drawing a connection between asthma and migraines. Dr. Vincent Martin with the Division of Internal Medicine says migraine patients with asthma were two times more likely to develop chronic migraines.

Cincinnati-area churches will be offering free health screenings to men, women and children this Sunday at 18 locations.  

Health Day involves more than 40 community partners and more than 800 volunteers working to reduce preventable health disparities in the city's urban community.  

According to Cradle Cincinnati, babies born to women who smoke during pregnancy are 44% more likely to die before their first birthday. The local organization, created to help reduce our area’s infant mortality rate, has just launched a campaign to help pregnant women stop smoking. 

A new effort is underway in Cincinnati to address health disparities in urban neighborhoods.  First Lady Dena Cranley and about 20 pastors' wives are involved in the program.  

Cranley launched the First Ladies Health Initiative Friday during an event at City Hall.

“This initiative will leverage the leadership of the first ladies of the churches of Cincinnati to empower their congregation and community to make smart decisions about health and wellness,” Cranley said.   

 

  

 

Bike Week

May 11, 2014

  

  Approximately 18 times each day, someone dies while waiting for an organ transplant. Today there are more than 117,000 people waiting for a life-saving transplant. April is National Donate Life Month, and joining us to discuss organ donation is Dr.

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  Alzheimer's is a devastating disease with no known cure. It slowly steals a person's intellect, ability to communicate, independence, and dignity, and now affects more than five million Americans. We look at what we know about Alzheimer’s disease, with Miami University Department of Sociology & Gerontology Assistant Professor Dr. Kate de Medeiros and Professor Dr. Jennifer M. Kinney. Dr. de Medeiros and Dr.

Provided, University of Cincinnati

  The Center for Closing the Health Gap recently launched a campaign to raise awareness of inequalities throughout our region that cause vulnerable populations in Cincinnati to have poorer health and shorter life expectancies. Closing the Health Gap Founder and President Dwight Tillery  and Executive Director Renee Mahaffey Harris talk about the campaign and initiatives to eliminate health inequalities in greater Cincinnati.

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The Teenage Mind

Feb 11, 2014
Provided

  As any parent with teenagers can tell you, those teen years can sometimes be confusing, aggravating, and frustrating.  Many have asked the question, “What is going on inside their heads?”  In his new book, BRAINSTORM: The Power and Purpose of the Teenage Brain, Neuropsychologist Dr. Daniel Siegel sheds some light on the subject, and explains why teens think the way they do.

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