Hamilton County Sheriff's Department

Hamilton County Sheriff's Department

UPDATE 5/15/14 : Greenwood & Streicher are expected to release one or two more reports says Michael Robison, Director of Media and Public Relations with the Sheriff's Office. The consulting group is also analyzing the department's Enforcement and Support Services divisions. Robison says it is uncertain when that/those reports will be ready.


Hamilton County Sheriff Jim Neil says training, staffing and information technology remain key areas of concern for his department.

Hamilton County is dedicating a full-time Sheriff's deputy to catching semis and others breaking commercial vehicle laws.

The Sheriff and county engineer have been working together on this issue but now Engineer Ted Hubbard says the departments are formalizing the arrangement.

"We have to be able to make sure that the vehicles that travel over the roadway system are the proper weight and the proper size," says Hubbard. "If they're not it can cause undue damage to the infrastructure system."

An audit of the Hamilton County Sheriff's department is recommending three issues be addressed. They include: staffing, technology and training.

The report concludes department staff are highly disciplined and resilient but also static and resistant to change. It says the agency, under former Sheriff Simon Leis, became "frozen in time" which prevents it from adopting more modern procedures and practices.


Hamilton County Sheriff Jim Neil says deputies who used a Taser early Tuesday morning to subdue a man resisting arrest appear to have followed department protocols.

59-year-old Gary Roell stopped breathing after the incident and was pronounced dead at Bethesda North Hospital.

"These are instances where you are justified in deploying a Taser: in protection of others, including yourself; and to meet the resistance of someone who is not complying, who is resisting arrest, to gain control of the situation," says Neil.

Hamilton County Sheriff's Department

Mickey Esposito, a lounge singer, and former supervisor of the Hamilton County Sheriff's Department property room, is headed to prison.

Judge Steve Martin sentenced Esposito to six years in jail on charges of trafficking and theft for stealing  Oxycodone, marijuana and jewelry and giving it to his wife and stepson to sell.

Esposito's wife, Allison Esposito, will serve four years in jail.  Her son, sentenced last Thursday, got two years in prison.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

A new report from the ACLU says pay-to-stay jail fees are not the revenue generator they appear to be. The American Civil Liberties Union studied such programs at three jails, including the Hamilton County jail. During a news conference Wednesday, the ACLU said collections agencies often pose an additional financial drain on counties, with minimal results and often ruin the credit rating of people who have left jail but cannot afford to pay these fees.