Hamilton County Heroin Coalition

Provided

Hamilton County will host a summit next month on the heroin crisis. Commissioner Denise Driehaus says it will highlight what the heroin coalition has been doing and solicit ideas for dealing with the epidemic.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

The Hamilton County Heroin Coalition will use one quarter of a new $400,000 federal grant to predict who might be the next overdose victim and get them into treatment before it happens.

Wikimedia Commons

Hamilton County's leaders aren't counting on help from the state to build an opioid diversion center. Commissioners passed a motion directing the administration to look into building such a facility.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

The maker of Narcan is making a research grant to Hamilton County that will provide nearly $2 million worth of the overdose antidote to combat the local heroin crisis.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Just like the drug problem, the Hamilton County Heroin Coalition continues to grow.

The group welcomed two more representatives to its regular meeting Friday, The Health Collaborative, representing hospitals, and the Amos Project, representing the faith community.

East Tennessee Children's Hospital / YouTube

The number of babies born drug dependent continues to increase. In Greater Cincinnati and elsewhere neonatologists are looking for answers.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Two people have been indicted by a federal grand jury in Cincinnati on charges to distribute heroin laced with a drug used as an animal tranquilizer. Acting U.S. Attorney Benjamin Glassman announced the charges Wednesday afternoon against 31-year-old Phillip Watkins and 28-year-old Jeanetta Crawford.

commons.wikimedia.org

Despite a spike in heroin overdoses in Hamilton County this week, local supply of an antidote is not in jeopardy. First responders still have access to naloxone, according to Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black. The Cincinnati Fire Department indicated it may need an additional $100,000 to purchase more naloxone. Black says that's not a problem for the budget.

Cincinnati area police are on the hunt for the source of a tainted heroin batch that caused 21 people to overdose in 24 hours Tuesday in the areas of Price Hill, Camp Washington and the Beekman Street Corridor. All have recovered after emergency personnel administered Narcan.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Hamilton County police and prosecutors are starting to make progress in identifying heroin dealers and charging them with the overdose deaths or near deaths of their users.

Wikipedia, available for use.

Last month, Kroger made Naloxone, a heroin-overdose reversal medication, available without a prescription in the Tri-state. The drug works within minutes and it is believed will save many lives. Ohio and Kentucky rank in the top five for highest overdose death rate, according to the Centers for Disease Control; heroin and prescription pain relievers like fentanyl are responsible for a majority of those deaths.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

The Hamilton County Heroin Coalition Task Force is launching a new initiative to deal with the problem in the region. 

Tom Synan, Newtown's Chief of Police and director of the task force, says it's called Not In My Neighborhood and focuses on community support.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Update Friday 11:00 a.m.:

Dennis Deters has been sworn into office. Hamilton County Clerk of Courts Tracy Winkler administered the oath of office.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Hamilton County's Heroin Task Force has released a strategic plan to address the drug epidemic in the region. 

Commission President Greg Hartmann says coalition members will work on several fronts including interdiction, treatment, and prevention. 

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Hamilton County Sheriff Jim Neil deputized members of the county's heroin task force Thursday morning so they are able to make arrests in communities outside their jurisdictions. 

The purpose of deputizing them is to further disrupt the flow the drug, which continues to have a strong hold on the area.

Newtown Police Chief Tom Synan is leading the effort.

"What's big about this is no matter where you are dealing heroin, no matter where your user goes, it's going to come back to you," Synan said. 

Pages