gun violence

In the latest Columbus budget, there's $1 million set aside to install a new system called ShotSpotter. It’s a computer software that uses microphone-like sensors in neighborhoods to detect gunfire, and it tells police nearly exactly where shootings happened. 

April is a hard month for Paula Reed — even though it has been 19 years.

April 20 is the anniversary of the Columbine massacre. That day in 1999, two Littleton, Colo., high school students killed 12 students and one teacher before killing themselves.

Reed was a teacher at Columbine High School school that day, and still is today. This week, she spoke to NPR from the same classroom she was teaching in before everything happened.

When Lane Murdock, a high school sophomore, heard that 17 high school students and educators had been killed in a shooting in Parkland, Fla., she says she felt numb.

To her, and so many others, mass shootings can feel all too common in the U.S.

"In the time I've been in high school we've had the Pulse, Las Vegas and now, [the Parkland] shooting," Murdock says.

gun violence
Pixabay

Beginning with Columbine high school on April 20, 1999, more than 187,000 students have experienced a shooting at their primary or secondary school, according to a Washington Post analysis. But school shootings are extremely rare compared to other forms of gun violence children face. Almost two dozen children are shot in the U.S. every day. The impact of violence has spread fear among students and changed the learning environment.

What Motivates A Mass Shooter?

Apr 10, 2018
gun barrel
Pexels

After a mass shooting, questions turn to what led the shooter to such a violent act. Was he motivated by hate, as in the case of Charleston, S.C., church shooter Dylann Roof? Was he self-radicalized, as with Pulse nightclub shooter Omar Mateen? The University of Cincinnati College of Law currently is examining what triggers a person to move from hateful thoughts to actual violence.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

"I, for one, am glad it's snowing," Elena Villalon told a cheering crowd in front of Cincinnati's City Hall Saturday morning. The University of Cincinnati junior continued, "Because I see a lot of snowflakes, and together we make up a snow storm."

WCPO

A handful of Tri-state schools heeded a national call to demonstrate Wednesday against gun violence following a Florida school shooting earlier this month.

Hamilton County commissioners may ask the county prosecutor to investigate steps the board can take to curb gun violence.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black says the city's police department is making progress as it investigates the shooting incident early Sunday morning at Cameo Night Club on Kellogg Avenue.  

One person was killed and another 16 were injured when gun fire broke out inside the club.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Cincinnati police now say 17 people were shot inside a night club early Sunday morning.  

Police Chief Eliot Isaac tells City Council's Law and Public Safety Committee another victim came forward Sunday night.  

Channel 9, WCPO

Update 12:05 p.m.:

Cincinnati Police say one person is dead and 15 wounded from a shooting inside a nightclub early Sunday morning. Police Chief Eliot Isaac said the shooting at Cameo Night Club at 4601 Kellogg was the result of a conflict that started earlier in the day.  

The Cincinnati Police Department is working to finalize a contract to bring the ShotSpotter system to Avondale.

 

The system uses microphones to pick up and locate gunfire.

 

Sarah Ramsey

Cincinnati Council Member P.G. Sittenfeld is in Washington, D.C. Tuesday for a meeting at the White House on gun violence.

Sittenfeld will be part of session with Vice President Joe Biden and officials from state and local governments

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Gun violence is on the rise nationwide and in Greater Cincinnati. Local law enforcement are revising the way they work together in order to catch the worst offenders.

Leaders from across Hamilton and Butler counties say the new approach is paying off.

Michael E. Keating

The number of shootings in Cincinnati has been increasing this year, and now the police department is launching an effort to reduce the violence.  

Starting Sunday, 75 officers will be assigned to a Violent Crime Response (VCR) team.

Cincinnati has experienced a dramatic increase in gun violence this year, as of early September, more than 320 people were shot within the city limits. 

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell, along with his district commanders and assistant chiefs, will hold a series of community meetings Thursday and Friday with community members aimed at stemming a rising tide of gun violence in the city.

Michael E. Keating

Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black is asking Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell for a 90-day action plan to reduce violence in the city.  Black wants the proposal by Friday.

Provided / Hamilton County Sheriff's Department

Ohio legislators are considering a bill that would require toy guns only be sold in bright colors to help distinguish them from real ones. But it seems some criminals might try using that to their advantage.

The Hamilton County Sheriff's Office reports deputies responding to a call about a man with a weapon located the suspect with a .380 caliber semi-automatic handgun.

A picture of the weapon shows it's been painted red to look like a toy gun.

The suspect was also carrying 9 grams of crack cocaine.

New Jersey Institute of Technology

Interest in "smart guns," using biometrics and radio frequency technology, has rebounded following recent gun violence. President Obama has included them as part of his plan to reduce such mass shootings. Who makes these guns? How do they work? And will they catch on? Ann Thompson reports in "Focus on Technology."

A group advocating for changes to state and national gun laws rallied on Fountain Square today with several dozen people attending the event, which featured speakers from law enforcement, medicine, politics and faith communities, as well as survivors of gun violence.

"Our purpose today, primarily, is to bring greater attention to the issues related to gun legislation, to call and demand action with regard to gun legislation," said Karen Hillis-Skipper, the event organizer and leader of the Cincinnati chapter of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America.

WVXU

Part of the President’s plan to reduce gun violence focuses on increased mental health services. Ann Thompson, in “Focus on Technology,” reports on Cincinnati efforts to be pro-active, involving a predictive spit test and photographing the brain.

 Dr. Jim Eliassen stands behinds glass at the University of Cincinnati Center for Imaging Research.