gun violence

Michael E. Keating

The number of shootings in Cincinnati has been increasing this year, and now the police department is launching an effort to reduce the violence.  

Starting Sunday, 75 officers will be assigned to a Violent Crime Response (VCR) team.

Cincinnati has experienced a dramatic increase in gun violence this year, as of early September, more than 320 people were shot within the city limits. 

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell, along with his district commanders and assistant chiefs, will hold a series of community meetings Thursday and Friday with community members aimed at stemming a rising tide of gun violence in the city.

Michael E. Keating

Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black is asking Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell for a 90-day action plan to reduce violence in the city.  Black wants the proposal by Friday.

Provided / Hamilton County Sheriff's Department

Ohio legislators are considering a bill that would require toy guns only be sold in bright colors to help distinguish them from real ones. But it seems some criminals might try using that to their advantage.

The Hamilton County Sheriff's Office reports deputies responding to a call about a man with a weapon located the suspect with a .380 caliber semi-automatic handgun.

A picture of the weapon shows it's been painted red to look like a toy gun.

The suspect was also carrying 9 grams of crack cocaine.

New Jersey Institute of Technology

Interest in "smart guns," using biometrics and radio frequency technology, has rebounded following recent gun violence. President Obama has included them as part of his plan to reduce such mass shootings. Who makes these guns? How do they work? And will they catch on? Ann Thompson reports in "Focus on Technology."

A group advocating for changes to state and national gun laws rallied on Fountain Square today with several dozen people attending the event, which featured speakers from law enforcement, medicine, politics and faith communities, as well as survivors of gun violence.

"Our purpose today, primarily, is to bring greater attention to the issues related to gun legislation, to call and demand action with regard to gun legislation," said Karen Hillis-Skipper, the event organizer and leader of the Cincinnati chapter of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America.


Part of the President’s plan to reduce gun violence focuses on increased mental health services. Ann Thompson, in “Focus on Technology,” reports on Cincinnati efforts to be pro-active, involving a predictive spit test and photographing the brain.

 Dr. Jim Eliassen stands behinds glass at the University of Cincinnati Center for Imaging Research.