Greg Hartmann

Sarah Ramsey / WVXU

Hamilton County Commissioners gather Monday for their annual organizational meeting.

Greg Hartmann is expected to take over as board president.

He says says jobs, public safety, and dealing with Metropolitan Sewer District issues top his plans for 2015.

Sarah Ramsey

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley and Hamilton County Commissioner Greg Hartmann said they are committed to fixing the broken relationship between the city and county concerning the Metropolitan Sewer District.  Both spoke after an hour long meeting Monday at City Hall.  

Hartmann said for MSD to be successful, the county has to have a coordinated approach with the city.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

A multi-million dollar sewer project is unexpectedly on hold and that has a lot of Hamilton County and Metropolitan Sewer District officials scratching their heads.

Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black did something no one was expecting on Dec. 5. He sent a letter to companies who'd bid to do work on the Lick Run Valley Conveyance System project, terminating negotiations. That came as a major surprise to Ulliman Schutte Construction, which had already been awarded the job and signed contracts with the Metropolitan Sewer District. 

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Update: The meeting to pitch Cincinnati for the 2016 GOP National Convention has been postponed, see tweet:

Provided / Commissioner Greg Hartmann's office.

Cincinnati's Union Terminal is in need of major repairs but Hamilton County Commissioner Greg Hartmann says the Museum Center is going to have to find a way to lower the price tag.

Hartmann says the current $180 million estimate is too high.

Two Hamilton County commissioners - Democrat Todd Portune and Republican Greg Hartmann - will be featured in Beyond Civility's new fall series of "Side-by-Side" conversations.

The two county commissioners will talk about their backgrounds and the influences that shaped their political views in a discussion on Tuesday, Oct. 22 at St. John's Unitarian Universalist Church, 320 Resor Ave., Clifton.

The event, which is free and open to the public, begins at 6:30 p.m. and is preceded by a social hour with light refreshments at 5:30 p.m.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Hamilton County Commissioners are expected to vote Wednesday morning on re-opening the bidding process on some Metropolitan Sewer District projects.

The board initiated the moratorium to force renewed talks between the county and the city, which runs the sewer district. At issue are several city initiated hiring policies and practices the county dislikes, and in some cases says are illegal.

The county is re-opening the bid process following a city council vote two weeks ago to suspend the hiring policies until August.

Sarah Ramsey

Greg Hartmann and Todd Portune were officially sworn in Wednesday to serve their new terms on Hamilton County Commission.

Hartmann repeated his mantra that these are challenging times for county government but says there are bright spots as well, like the county Land Bank.

Hamilton County Recorder Wayne Coates reversed his decision to close his office on Fridays due to budget cuts after more money was made available to his office Thursday.

Coates' office put out a statement late Thursday afternoon saying that Coates and Hamilton County commission president Greg Hartmann "reviewed updated recorder revenue projections for 2013 and concluded that more resources should be made available" to allow the office to stay open on Fridays.

Coates said in the statement that his earlier decision to reduce his 21-member staff by three will stand, though.

The Hamilton County Board of Elections isn’t finished counting the votes from the Nov. 6 election; but it was only a matter of time before the 2013 race for Cincinnati mayor began.

John Cranley, the former Democratic city councilman and two-time congressional candidate, settled that hash this week when he announced he will be a candidate for mayor, issuing a press release and holding a flurry of media interviews.

Clearly, the 38-year-old Cranley, who has been out of office for nearly four years now, saw the value of being the first horse out of the gate.