Greater Cincinnati Water Works

Sarah Ramsey

So far the city is saving money by merging the administrative functions of the Greater Cincinnati Water Works, the Metropolitan Sewer District and the stormwater utility.  

A council committee got an update Tuesday.  

The savings right now is projected to be $55 million during the next decade.  That is less than the initial feasibility study suggested, but officials are still crunching the numbers.  

Director Tony Parrott said so far, so good.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Greater Cincinnati Water Works is getting a pat on the back from the head of the Ohio EPA.

During a tour of the Richard Miller Treatment Plant, EPA Director Craig Butler lauded the facility's work and quick response to emergencies like the recent fuel spill on the Ohio River.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Water is a big topic these days. There's a scarcity of it out West. Algae blooms shut down Toledo's drinking water system earlier this month, and Cincinnati remains on the leading edge of water technology. But those are all obvious. We see or hear about them frequently.  WVXU went looking behind-the-scenes at a hidden aspect of our water delivery system - something thousands of Cincinnatians pass each day but never truly see.

Last week Cincinnati Council members could not agree on whether to raise city water rates.  They will try again during a public hearing Monday.
 

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Rain barrels decorated by students and artists from around the Tristate are on display at the Cincinnati Zoo. The 2nd annual Rain Barrel Art Project sponsored by Save Local Waters is part of a push to raise awareness about environmental education and, of course, to get more people to capture rain water to reduce water usage.

Pages